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How does Fallout 76 compare to real life?


 

Last week, I got the chance to try my hand at Bethesda’s next entry in the Fallout series, Fallout 76. As most Fallout fans who have been following the game probably know, the game takes place entirely in West Virginia.

To keep things thematic, Bethesda held the entire preview event in West Virginia, at the Greenbrier Resort. And, as it turns out, the Greenbrier Resort is one of the places that made it into the game.

I made a beeline for the Greenbrier Resort, and spent the first hour or so of my playthrough just getting to familiar ground. From there, I wandered around the post-apocalyptic hotel (now staffed by robots) and then decided, hey, let’s get some real life pictures so everyone else can enjoy this comparison, too.

I started on the grounds, near the Tennis Club. You can see that the game gets a lot of details right, down to the shape of the sign post holding up the Tennis Club sign, though the foliage is a little different. The courts are there, though. (And filled with scorchers. Don’t get too close.)

Continuing down that path, there’s the start of a walking trail that goes down and into the Greenbrier’s golf course. This is one of the points where the comparison between games and reality breaks up the most—though the start of the path is here, the Greenbrier golf course itself is huge, and got compressed a bit for the sake of space. There’s not much on the grounds in this direction that fits 1:1 with the game and real life, but you can still wander around and follow the course.

Heading up towards the north entrance of the hotel, there’s a very distinctive circular memorial garden that, of course, made it into the game. I also ran into a Deathclaw around here in game, which, thankfully, was not something I saw in real life.

The north entrance itself has seen better days. Like 2018. All those flags got overgrown pretty quickly after the bombs went off, huh?

Now, finally, the inside of the resort. This is just inside the north entrance, looking back out. Note that there are the same little shops off to the left and the same staircase headed down (though, in real life, the middle section of this staircase is a ramp). Even the carpeting is similar. I want some of those robot attendants, though.

Even the hallways of the hotel look fairly alike, with similar wallpaper and color schemes. You can’t go into any rooms, though, at least not that I found—the elevator in the game doesn’t go up to the floors where people stay.

On the second story, there’s this lovely dining area near a lounge piano. Again, here, the design team paid a lot of attention to the style of table, the way the chairs are arranged, and even the pattern of the fabric. You can match up the potted plants sitting on the tables as well.

Lastly, I made my way down the hall from this area, towards the conference rooms. There, I was greeted with a surreal sight: the door to the very conference room I was sitting inside, in real life, playing the game. (Thankfully, I wasn’t suffering from Rad Worms in real life.) Sadly, the in-game door was locked with a panel I couldn’t access yet.

Overall, it was definitely recognizable. Some areas were off-limits—I couldn’t get up to my hotel room, for example, as only the first two floors made it into the game—but I was able to navigate around in the in-game version of the resort using my knowledge of the real-life resort, and appreciate little details like the placement of the lounge piano. The area outside the resort suffered more from the space constraints, but golf courses are pretty big. That’s a lot of empty space to walk across in real life, and even more so in-game. And there’s still enough open ground that building your camp in the middle of the golf course is a valid option, if you want to try it (as I did).

Fallout 76 releases on November 14th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

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About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

How does Fallout 76 compare to real life?

Fallout 76 packs in the West Virginian landmarks, but how true-to-life are they? We took a look at one example to find out.

By Emma Schaefer | 10/9/2018 04:30 PM PT

Features

Last week, I got the chance to try my hand at Bethesda’s next entry in the Fallout series, Fallout 76. As most Fallout fans who have been following the game probably know, the game takes place entirely in West Virginia.

To keep things thematic, Bethesda held the entire preview event in West Virginia, at the Greenbrier Resort. And, as it turns out, the Greenbrier Resort is one of the places that made it into the game.

I made a beeline for the Greenbrier Resort, and spent the first hour or so of my playthrough just getting to familiar ground. From there, I wandered around the post-apocalyptic hotel (now staffed by robots) and then decided, hey, let’s get some real life pictures so everyone else can enjoy this comparison, too.

I started on the grounds, near the Tennis Club. You can see that the game gets a lot of details right, down to the shape of the sign post holding up the Tennis Club sign, though the foliage is a little different. The courts are there, though. (And filled with scorchers. Don’t get too close.)

Continuing down that path, there’s the start of a walking trail that goes down and into the Greenbrier’s golf course. This is one of the points where the comparison between games and reality breaks up the most—though the start of the path is here, the Greenbrier golf course itself is huge, and got compressed a bit for the sake of space. There’s not much on the grounds in this direction that fits 1:1 with the game and real life, but you can still wander around and follow the course.

Heading up towards the north entrance of the hotel, there’s a very distinctive circular memorial garden that, of course, made it into the game. I also ran into a Deathclaw around here in game, which, thankfully, was not something I saw in real life.

The north entrance itself has seen better days. Like 2018. All those flags got overgrown pretty quickly after the bombs went off, huh?

Now, finally, the inside of the resort. This is just inside the north entrance, looking back out. Note that there are the same little shops off to the left and the same staircase headed down (though, in real life, the middle section of this staircase is a ramp). Even the carpeting is similar. I want some of those robot attendants, though.

Even the hallways of the hotel look fairly alike, with similar wallpaper and color schemes. You can’t go into any rooms, though, at least not that I found—the elevator in the game doesn’t go up to the floors where people stay.

On the second story, there’s this lovely dining area near a lounge piano. Again, here, the design team paid a lot of attention to the style of table, the way the chairs are arranged, and even the pattern of the fabric. You can match up the potted plants sitting on the tables as well.

Lastly, I made my way down the hall from this area, towards the conference rooms. There, I was greeted with a surreal sight: the door to the very conference room I was sitting inside, in real life, playing the game. (Thankfully, I wasn’t suffering from Rad Worms in real life.) Sadly, the in-game door was locked with a panel I couldn’t access yet.

Overall, it was definitely recognizable. Some areas were off-limits—I couldn’t get up to my hotel room, for example, as only the first two floors made it into the game—but I was able to navigate around in the in-game version of the resort using my knowledge of the real-life resort, and appreciate little details like the placement of the lounge piano. The area outside the resort suffered more from the space constraints, but golf courses are pretty big. That’s a lot of empty space to walk across in real life, and even more so in-game. And there’s still enough open ground that building your camp in the middle of the golf course is a valid option, if you want to try it (as I did).

Fallout 76 releases on November 14th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM