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Battlefield


 

Yesterday’s Battlefield V reveal event introduced a ton of new information about game modes, gameplay mechanics, and live services, as well as debuting character customization for the first time in the series.

However, the trailer also created controversy with some of the bigger, um, sticklers in the Battlefield fan community—namely because it featured a woman (gasp!) with a prosthetic arm (double gasp!) fighting in a World War II battle (triple gasp!).

According to these fans, Battlefield V‘s inclusion of a disabled woman fighting on the frontlines during World War II is historically inaccurate and a sign that “political correctness” is compromising the historically accurate standard set by the Battlefield series as a whole.

Battlefield V executive producer has responded to these criticisms on Twitter, saying that Battlefield will always “put fun over authentic” in a response to Game Informer Australia editor David Milner’s cheeky, sarcastic GIF of a flametrooper and a sentry riding atop a horse in Battlefield 1.

The point is that Battlefield has never really been an historically accurate series. Not only can players pull off insane moves (like the three-player horse-riding above) that would never happen in actual combat, but even the game’s built-in mechanics refute historical accuracy.

For example, Battlefield 1, which is set during World War I, features many weapons and attachments that were prototypes at best, let alone never used in actual combat during the war. Why? Because a Battlefield game with only single-action rifles would be boring.

Character customization in Battlefield V will play into the game’s new Tides of War, a series of live events and challenges that players can complete to earn new cosmetic items for their characters and weapons. Players will also be able to purchase unique cosmetic items directly, which will help fund the game’s DLC development, as Battlefield V is dropping the series’ recent Premium Pass model.

Battlefield V will launch on October 19th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Source: IGN

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About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Battlefield producer responds to cries against ‘political correctness’

Apparently Battlefield V has actually been F U N W A S H E D.

By Michael Goroff | 05/24/2018 03:00 PM PT

News

Yesterday’s Battlefield V reveal event introduced a ton of new information about game modes, gameplay mechanics, and live services, as well as debuting character customization for the first time in the series.

However, the trailer also created controversy with some of the bigger, um, sticklers in the Battlefield fan community—namely because it featured a woman (gasp!) with a prosthetic arm (double gasp!) fighting in a World War II battle (triple gasp!).

According to these fans, Battlefield V‘s inclusion of a disabled woman fighting on the frontlines during World War II is historically inaccurate and a sign that “political correctness” is compromising the historically accurate standard set by the Battlefield series as a whole.

Battlefield V executive producer has responded to these criticisms on Twitter, saying that Battlefield will always “put fun over authentic” in a response to Game Informer Australia editor David Milner’s cheeky, sarcastic GIF of a flametrooper and a sentry riding atop a horse in Battlefield 1.

The point is that Battlefield has never really been an historically accurate series. Not only can players pull off insane moves (like the three-player horse-riding above) that would never happen in actual combat, but even the game’s built-in mechanics refute historical accuracy.

For example, Battlefield 1, which is set during World War I, features many weapons and attachments that were prototypes at best, let alone never used in actual combat during the war. Why? Because a Battlefield game with only single-action rifles would be boring.

Character customization in Battlefield V will play into the game’s new Tides of War, a series of live events and challenges that players can complete to earn new cosmetic items for their characters and weapons. Players will also be able to purchase unique cosmetic items directly, which will help fund the game’s DLC development, as Battlefield V is dropping the series’ recent Premium Pass model.

Battlefield V will launch on October 19th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Source: IGN

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About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.