X
X
Battlefield


 

One of the biggest problems facing the PC version of Battlefield V is how prevalent cheating seems to be. In response, developer DICE has published a blog post about its anti-cheat efforts that says a whole lot of nothing.

The post, written by DICE anti-cheat producer Sean Merson, touches on the developer’s anti-cheat efforts in the vaguest sense possible. According to post, DICE is working on better prevention, better detection, and keeping “up to date with the latest cheat developments and reacting to them in a faster and leaner matter.” Unfortunately, the blog post doesn’t get into specifics “to avoid revealing anything which cheaters and cheat program developers may take advantage of.”

DICE’s response to cheating didn’t go over well on Reddit, where many in the community are seeing the post as “don’t worry, we’re working on it,” without any tangible proof that their efforts are proving effective. Battlefield V employees a server-side anti-cheat program called FairFight, though some Reddit users suggest that DICE move over to something a little more effective, specifically the BattlEye system that PUBG Corp. uses for PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. That program has effectively banned millions of cheaters, though that hasn’t entirely stopped the game’s less honest players from discovering new exploits.

Cheating is already a problem in Battlefield V, but the upcoming launch of its battle royale mode, Firestorm, has players even more worried. Due to the nature of the genre, battle royale games are breeding grounds for cheaters, and publisher EA recently insinuated that Battlefield V has a lot riding on Firestorm’s ability to attract new players. If cheaters derail Firestorm’s launch on PC, it could leave a bad lasting impression for new players who are first picking up the game for its battle royale mode.

In the meantime, DICE’s best solution for slowing down cheaters is for players who suspect cheaters to report them and to protect their own accounts with log-in verification.

Read More

About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Battlefield V’s anti-cheat blog post says a whole lot of nothing

DICE might be taking cheating in Battlefield V seriously, but you couldn't tell from its recent post on the subject.

By Michael Goroff | 02/6/2019 01:30 PM PT

News

One of the biggest problems facing the PC version of Battlefield V is how prevalent cheating seems to be. In response, developer DICE has published a blog post about its anti-cheat efforts that says a whole lot of nothing.

The post, written by DICE anti-cheat producer Sean Merson, touches on the developer’s anti-cheat efforts in the vaguest sense possible. According to post, DICE is working on better prevention, better detection, and keeping “up to date with the latest cheat developments and reacting to them in a faster and leaner matter.” Unfortunately, the blog post doesn’t get into specifics “to avoid revealing anything which cheaters and cheat program developers may take advantage of.”

DICE’s response to cheating didn’t go over well on Reddit, where many in the community are seeing the post as “don’t worry, we’re working on it,” without any tangible proof that their efforts are proving effective. Battlefield V employees a server-side anti-cheat program called FairFight, though some Reddit users suggest that DICE move over to something a little more effective, specifically the BattlEye system that PUBG Corp. uses for PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. That program has effectively banned millions of cheaters, though that hasn’t entirely stopped the game’s less honest players from discovering new exploits.

Cheating is already a problem in Battlefield V, but the upcoming launch of its battle royale mode, Firestorm, has players even more worried. Due to the nature of the genre, battle royale games are breeding grounds for cheaters, and publisher EA recently insinuated that Battlefield V has a lot riding on Firestorm’s ability to attract new players. If cheaters derail Firestorm’s launch on PC, it could leave a bad lasting impression for new players who are first picking up the game for its battle royale mode.

In the meantime, DICE’s best solution for slowing down cheaters is for players who suspect cheaters to report them and to protect their own accounts with log-in verification.

Read More


About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.