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Fresh off its breakup with LawBreakers, developer Boss Key productions has already released its version of a battle royale game, Radical Heights. Unfortunately, early player counts aren’t exactly promising.

According to a recent report, Radical Heights‘ peak concurrent player count on launch day hit 8,500 players, which is only 1,000 more players than LawBreakers had at its peak on launch day.

To be fair, Radical Heights had much less help than LawBreakers in terms of marketing to create anticipation for its release, which occurred only a day after the game was announced. On the other hand, Radical Heights is a free-to-play game in the industry’s trendiest genre (as opposed to LawBreakers‘ comparatively ancient arena shooter model), so you’d expect more people would actually want to try it.

Radical Heights‘ failure to launch isn’t for a lack of exposure. The newest battle royale game on the block was the second most-watched game on Twitch when it launched, reaching 120,000 concurrent viewers. However, while some of the platform’s most influential personalities might be throwing Radical Heights a bone, it doesn’t seem like their fans are as eager.

Part of the problem could be that Radical Heights is currently an Early Access title exclusively on Steam. Its main competitor and obvious inspiration, Fortnite Battle Royale, launched simultaneously in early access on Steam, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One in September 2017. The other battle royale juggernaut, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, launched exclusively on Steam Early Access back in March 2017, but it benefited from being one of the only battle royale games on the market.

Radical Heights is in a tough position. A multiplatform launch might have benefited Radical Heights‘ player counts, but securing releases on console is a much more complicated and long-term process, and Radical Heights‘ main selling point is cashing in on a genre that is currently the biggest trend in gaming. On top of that, Radical Heights is facing stiff competition.

To add insult to injury, Radical Heights seems to be experiencing a hearty dose of performance issues. Things are so bad, apparently, that the game itself is pleading with players to bear with it:

Personally, I would be more than happy to give Radical Heights a shot if it came to consoles. The ’80s game show aesthetic is appealing, and it takes away the thing I hate most about Fortnite, which is the building. There seem to be a ton of good ideas in Radical Heights; it’s just a shame that so many gamers can’t actually play it.

Source: VG 24/7

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Boss Key’s follow-up to LawBreakers isn’t off to a strong start

Radical Heights' launch-day player counts aren't reaching, well, you know…

By Michael Goroff | 04/11/2018 03:00 PM PT | Updated 04/13/2018 02:41 PM PT

News

Fresh off its breakup with LawBreakers, developer Boss Key productions has already released its version of a battle royale game, Radical Heights. Unfortunately, early player counts aren’t exactly promising.

According to a recent report, Radical Heights‘ peak concurrent player count on launch day hit 8,500 players, which is only 1,000 more players than LawBreakers had at its peak on launch day.

To be fair, Radical Heights had much less help than LawBreakers in terms of marketing to create anticipation for its release, which occurred only a day after the game was announced. On the other hand, Radical Heights is a free-to-play game in the industry’s trendiest genre (as opposed to LawBreakers‘ comparatively ancient arena shooter model), so you’d expect more people would actually want to try it.

Radical Heights‘ failure to launch isn’t for a lack of exposure. The newest battle royale game on the block was the second most-watched game on Twitch when it launched, reaching 120,000 concurrent viewers. However, while some of the platform’s most influential personalities might be throwing Radical Heights a bone, it doesn’t seem like their fans are as eager.

Part of the problem could be that Radical Heights is currently an Early Access title exclusively on Steam. Its main competitor and obvious inspiration, Fortnite Battle Royale, launched simultaneously in early access on Steam, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One in September 2017. The other battle royale juggernaut, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, launched exclusively on Steam Early Access back in March 2017, but it benefited from being one of the only battle royale games on the market.

Radical Heights is in a tough position. A multiplatform launch might have benefited Radical Heights‘ player counts, but securing releases on console is a much more complicated and long-term process, and Radical Heights‘ main selling point is cashing in on a genre that is currently the biggest trend in gaming. On top of that, Radical Heights is facing stiff competition.

To add insult to injury, Radical Heights seems to be experiencing a hearty dose of performance issues. Things are so bad, apparently, that the game itself is pleading with players to bear with it:

Personally, I would be more than happy to give Radical Heights a shot if it came to consoles. The ’80s game show aesthetic is appealing, and it takes away the thing I hate most about Fortnite, which is the building. There seem to be a ton of good ideas in Radical Heights; it’s just a shame that so many gamers can’t actually play it.

Source: VG 24/7

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.