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Cyberpunk 2077 devs say it would be stupid to show gameplay right now


 

Cyberpunk 2077 had a very big first E3 this year, complete with an epic first trailer and a behind-closed-doors demo that generated a ton of buzz with those who got a chance to see the game in action. Unfortunately, if you were hoping that developer CD Projekt Red would later unveil that demo to the public, you will be disappointed.

Talking to IGN (via PC Gamer), Cyberpunk 2020 creator Mike Pondsmith, who’s been working closely with CD Projekt Red on Cyberpunk 2077, said that it was “very smart not to show the whole world gameplay.”

“If we’re going to do stuff that has never been done before—or has never been done the way we’re doing it—we need space, we need time, and we need the privacy to mull it over,” Pondsmith said. “If we have too many cooks in the kitchen we’re not going to get a good dinner out of it.”

CD Projekt president Adam Kiciński recently revealed that the E3 demo was actually from a pre-alpha build of the game, and co-founder Marcin Iwiński later elaborated that the demo was running on a PC with insane specs. Part of the reason that CD Projekt Red held back from revealing it to the public could be that the final version of the game might not match up to what was shown off at E3, especially not on console, leading to disappointment on the parts of the fans.

By avoiding this kind of negative feedback early on, it gives the developers room to build a “perfect” game, Pondsmith said.

“The game we have right now is pretty damn close to what I would have built if I built it alone myself in a broom closet,” he said. “I look at things in there and I just go, ‘Oh my God, that’s perfect. That’s just downright perfect.’ But to get that kind of perfection does take time. It takes iteration.”

Everything we’ve learned about the game so far—from its emergent consequence-based choice system to even its romantic options—have us intrigued as to what Cyberpunk 2077 will actually be when it gets closer to launch. Unfortunately, that sounds like it’s pretty far away at this point, though it will supposedly happen while current-gen consoles are still alive and kicking.

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About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Cyberpunk 2077 devs say it would be stupid to show gameplay right now

Showing off the demo too early would create too much noise around the game's development, according to the series' creator.

By Michael Goroff | 07/12/2018 12:30 PM PT

News

Cyberpunk 2077 had a very big first E3 this year, complete with an epic first trailer and a behind-closed-doors demo that generated a ton of buzz with those who got a chance to see the game in action. Unfortunately, if you were hoping that developer CD Projekt Red would later unveil that demo to the public, you will be disappointed.

Talking to IGN (via PC Gamer), Cyberpunk 2020 creator Mike Pondsmith, who’s been working closely with CD Projekt Red on Cyberpunk 2077, said that it was “very smart not to show the whole world gameplay.”

“If we’re going to do stuff that has never been done before—or has never been done the way we’re doing it—we need space, we need time, and we need the privacy to mull it over,” Pondsmith said. “If we have too many cooks in the kitchen we’re not going to get a good dinner out of it.”

CD Projekt president Adam Kiciński recently revealed that the E3 demo was actually from a pre-alpha build of the game, and co-founder Marcin Iwiński later elaborated that the demo was running on a PC with insane specs. Part of the reason that CD Projekt Red held back from revealing it to the public could be that the final version of the game might not match up to what was shown off at E3, especially not on console, leading to disappointment on the parts of the fans.

By avoiding this kind of negative feedback early on, it gives the developers room to build a “perfect” game, Pondsmith said.

“The game we have right now is pretty damn close to what I would have built if I built it alone myself in a broom closet,” he said. “I look at things in there and I just go, ‘Oh my God, that’s perfect. That’s just downright perfect.’ But to get that kind of perfection does take time. It takes iteration.”

Everything we’ve learned about the game so far—from its emergent consequence-based choice system to even its romantic options—have us intrigued as to what Cyberpunk 2077 will actually be when it gets closer to launch. Unfortunately, that sounds like it’s pretty far away at this point, though it will supposedly happen while current-gen consoles are still alive and kicking.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.