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Dead Space


 

Following EA’s closure of Visceral Games, more details about the studio’s past performances have started to emerge, and it’s beginning to sound like the writing was on the wall for Visceral’s shutdown.

Zach Wilson, a former level designer at Visceral, recently tweeted that the developer’s third-person sci-fi horror sequel Dead Space 2 failed commercially, at least from EA’s viewpoint, despite selling 4 million copies.

That’s because, according to Wilson, not only did the game cost $60 million to make, but the marketing budget matched the production budget. Add to that the percentages that retailers and console-makers took from the game’s overall revenue, and EA was left with a game that didn’t meet its profit-margin expectations.

Of course, despite EA’s commercial disappointment, Dead Space 2 went on to get a sequel in Dead Space 3, which also ended up falling short of EA’s sales expectations. Add to that Battlefield Hardline falling short of previous Battlefield game sales, and it looks like EA’s confidence in Visceral providing a best-seller had been waning for years.

EA announced yesterday that the publisher was shutting down Visceral Games and “shifting as many of the team as possible to other projects and teams at EA,” according to EA executive vice president Patrick Söderlund.

Adding insult to injury, EA revealed that the Star Wars game that was in production at Visceral and creatively directed by Uncharted director Amy Hennig was going to see major overhauls, moving away from a linear adventure to a “broader experience” that will aim to better fit “fundamental shifts in the marketplace.” In other words, it’s probably going from being a great single-player experience to another Star Wars game beset by microtransactions and loot boxes.

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Source: GameSpot


About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Dead Space 2 was a commercial failure, despite selling millions

A former Visceral Games level designer claims that EA spent a ridiculous amount on the Dead Space sequel's marketing alone.

By Michael Goroff | 10/18/2017 03:00 PM PT | Updated 10/18/2017 04:14 PM PT

News

Following EA’s closure of Visceral Games, more details about the studio’s past performances have started to emerge, and it’s beginning to sound like the writing was on the wall for Visceral’s shutdown.

Zach Wilson, a former level designer at Visceral, recently tweeted that the developer’s third-person sci-fi horror sequel Dead Space 2 failed commercially, at least from EA’s viewpoint, despite selling 4 million copies.

That’s because, according to Wilson, not only did the game cost $60 million to make, but the marketing budget matched the production budget. Add to that the percentages that retailers and console-makers took from the game’s overall revenue, and EA was left with a game that didn’t meet its profit-margin expectations.

Of course, despite EA’s commercial disappointment, Dead Space 2 went on to get a sequel in Dead Space 3, which also ended up falling short of EA’s sales expectations. Add to that Battlefield Hardline falling short of previous Battlefield game sales, and it looks like EA’s confidence in Visceral providing a best-seller had been waning for years.

EA announced yesterday that the publisher was shutting down Visceral Games and “shifting as many of the team as possible to other projects and teams at EA,” according to EA executive vice president Patrick Söderlund.

Adding insult to injury, EA revealed that the Star Wars game that was in production at Visceral and creatively directed by Uncharted director Amy Hennig was going to see major overhauls, moving away from a linear adventure to a “broader experience” that will aim to better fit “fundamental shifts in the marketplace.” In other words, it’s probably going from being a great single-player experience to another Star Wars game beset by microtransactions and loot boxes.

Read More

Source: GameSpot



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.