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In an interview with NowGamer, Antony Johnston, writer of the original Dead Space, described Dead Space 3’s emphasis on action “a necessary evil in order to broaden the fan base.”

“I know the developers always wanted to go bigger, in terms of scope,” Johnston said. “And I’ve mentioned before that the universe we created was huge, with lots of elements, which simply didn’t make it into the first game. So to get that story told, to round out the universe, it was inevitable the settings and environments would open out a bit, become a bit more epic in scale.”

Which makes total sense to me—both as a gamer, and a fiction writer. If you deliver the same thing every time, it feels like pandering to that first wave of fans. In Hollywood, the rule of sequels is “the same, but different.” This is also applicable to games, and I feel like Dead Space exemplifies this. By Dead Space 3, Isaac shouldn’t be quite as scared of the Necromorphs as he was during that first encounter on the Ishimura.

“You’d just have the same game on a different ship each time,” said Johnston.

And if you just want the same exact experience the original Dead Space delivered, one-to-one, why not just pop the goddamn game in your goddamn Xbox 360, PS3, or PC and play it all goddamn day?

Dead Space Writer Describes DS3’s Action as ‘A Necessary Evil’

By | 02/10/2013 10:00 AM PT

News

In an interview with NowGamer, Antony Johnston, writer of the original Dead Space, described Dead Space 3’s emphasis on action “a necessary evil in order to broaden the fan base.”

“I know the developers always wanted to go bigger, in terms of scope,” Johnston said. “And I’ve mentioned before that the universe we created was huge, with lots of elements, which simply didn’t make it into the first game. So to get that story told, to round out the universe, it was inevitable the settings and environments would open out a bit, become a bit more epic in scale.”

Which makes total sense to me—both as a gamer, and a fiction writer. If you deliver the same thing every time, it feels like pandering to that first wave of fans. In Hollywood, the rule of sequels is “the same, but different.” This is also applicable to games, and I feel like Dead Space exemplifies this. By Dead Space 3, Isaac shouldn’t be quite as scared of the Necromorphs as he was during that first encounter on the Ishimura.

“You’d just have the same game on a different ship each time,” said Johnston.

And if you just want the same exact experience the original Dead Space delivered, one-to-one, why not just pop the goddamn game in your goddamn Xbox 360, PS3, or PC and play it all goddamn day?

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