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Destiny


 

Early visions of Destiny leaned more heavily toward fantasy over science fiction before ultimately becoming a blend of the two, senior writer Eric Osborne told IGN in a recent interview.

According to Osborne, the team refers to their blend of genre settings/tropes as “mythic science fiction,” describing it as “a world that’s rooted in science fiction, but with more fantastical elements than we’ve ever had before, at least with Halo.”

“Really, the artists were trying to push hard away from sci-fi because of the Halo legacy and history,” Osborne told IGN. “They were just thinking, ‘What can we do that’s radically different after 10 years?’ So there’s actually some concept art that you can find online of a very fantasy-driven world of knights, swords, and sorcery in a white city on a hill.

“That was very much pure fantasy, but the more they continued to work and the more their ideas formed over time,t he more they realized that the lure of sci-fi was just something they loved and they were denying themselves that creative space. So they thought, ‘What if we just take these two things and smash them together?’”

Destiny launches for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360 sometime 2014. A beta open to anyone who pre-orders Bungie’s first post-Halo project will kick off in the spring.

Bungie’s Destiny Originally Leaned More Toward Fantasy to Set It Apart from Halo

By | 11/1/2013 03:28 PM PT

News

Early visions of Destiny leaned more heavily toward fantasy over science fiction before ultimately becoming a blend of the two, senior writer Eric Osborne told IGN in a recent interview.

According to Osborne, the team refers to their blend of genre settings/tropes as “mythic science fiction,” describing it as “a world that’s rooted in science fiction, but with more fantastical elements than we’ve ever had before, at least with Halo.”

“Really, the artists were trying to push hard away from sci-fi because of the Halo legacy and history,” Osborne told IGN. “They were just thinking, ‘What can we do that’s radically different after 10 years?’ So there’s actually some concept art that you can find online of a very fantasy-driven world of knights, swords, and sorcery in a white city on a hill.

“That was very much pure fantasy, but the more they continued to work and the more their ideas formed over time,t he more they realized that the lure of sci-fi was just something they loved and they were denying themselves that creative space. So they thought, ‘What if we just take these two things and smash them together?’”

Destiny launches for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360 sometime 2014. A beta open to anyone who pre-orders Bungie’s first post-Halo project will kick off in the spring.

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