X

REGISTER TO CUSTOMIZE
YOUR NEWS AND GET ALERTS
ON your favorite games

Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions
No thanks, take me to EGMNOW
X
Customize your news
for instant alerts on
your favorite games
Register below
(it only takes seconds)
Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions


X
X


 

Nintendo tried the digital download route in Japan with New Super Mario Bros. 2, and despite the mild reception to the box-less version of the game, it’s apparently done well enough to satisfy company president Satoru Iwata. So far, sales of the digital version have accounted for 5 percent of total sales compared standard box-and-cartridge copy.

Iwata told the Wall Street Journal that he felt the company got a “good reaction” from the experiment.

Digital sales of NSMB2 probably won’t be as promising in other regions, though.

Some odd pricing habits actually made the digital version more expensive in the UK, where 3DS owners had to pay an extra 10 British Pounds for it on the Nintendo eShop.

Digital downloads will probably be hit or miss on a case-by-case basis for first-party titles, but Nintendo would probably love to push more digital sales in order to cut down on production costs for certain titles over others.

Notably, Brain Age sequel Demon Training did far better in the digital space than NSMB2, selling about 20 percent of the game’s stock compared to physical copies.

Source: Wall Street Journal

0   POINTS
0   POINTS


Digital Sales Of New Super Mario Bros. 2 Aren’t Looking So Hot

Nintendo tried the digital download route in Japan with New Super Mario Bros. 2, and despite the mild reception to the box-less version of the game, it's apparently done well enough to satisfy company president Satoru Iwata.

By EGM Staff | 08/17/2012 03:40 PM PT

News

Nintendo tried the digital download route in Japan with New Super Mario Bros. 2, and despite the mild reception to the box-less version of the game, it’s apparently done well enough to satisfy company president Satoru Iwata. So far, sales of the digital version have accounted for 5 percent of total sales compared standard box-and-cartridge copy.

Iwata told the Wall Street Journal that he felt the company got a “good reaction” from the experiment.

Digital sales of NSMB2 probably won’t be as promising in other regions, though.

Some odd pricing habits actually made the digital version more expensive in the UK, where 3DS owners had to pay an extra 10 British Pounds for it on the Nintendo eShop.

Digital downloads will probably be hit or miss on a case-by-case basis for first-party titles, but Nintendo would probably love to push more digital sales in order to cut down on production costs for certain titles over others.

Notably, Brain Age sequel Demon Training did far better in the digital space than NSMB2, selling about 20 percent of the game’s stock compared to physical copies.

Source: Wall Street Journal

0   POINTS
0   POINTS