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Concerning a new Bad Company installment, it’s not a matter of DICE ignoring their fanbase, they’re just unsure what made Bad Company so popular, CEO Karl-Magnus Troedsson explained in a recent interview with Eurogamer.

“Some people say they found the multiplayer controls faster and more direct,” Troedsson told Eurogamer. “Some people liked the single-player and the characters and the humor. People love different things about it. It’s starting to almost get to that place where, if we were to make a sequel to Bad Company, what would than even imply?

“It’s scary to go back and try to remake an old fan favorite when actually no-one can really put their finger on what it is people love. Bringing back the characters and creating a great single-player out of that, sure, I can understand that.

“But some people say this: the Bad Company 2 multiplayer is the best you’ve ever done. Okay, why is that? It’s hard for people to articulate what that is, which is actually hard for us. It would be hard to remake something like that. Can we do it? Of course. We have our theories when it comes to the multiplayer.”

It sounds to me—and you can call my crazy here, Karl—that both the single-player and multiplayer were so good that the Bad Company games offered different things to a multitude of players. Maybe the reason you can’t put your finger on what made it great and people keep giving you different answers is that you appealed to such a wide audience, for once, that a lot of different people found something to love. Definitely not something that can be said for Battlefield 3 or 4.

Troedsson closed by offering Bad Company fans the faintest glimmer of hope, saying the sub-brand is not dead and it can be revived—but unless it’s suddenly revealed that Preston, Sweetwater, Haggard, and Sarge have suddenly become the funniest boys in blue since Steve Gutenberg and gang in Police Academy—those fans will definitely have to wait at least a little while longer.

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About Ray Carsillo

view all posts

Ray has extensive roots in geek culture, as he’s written about videogames, comics, and movies for such outlets as Newsday.com, ESPNNewYork.com, Classic Game Room on YouTube, Collider.com, and Comicvine.com before finally settling into his role as EGM’s reviews editor. His main goal in life? To become king of all geek media, of course! Find him on Twitter @RayCarsillo

EA DICE knows fans want more Bad Company, not sure how to deliver it

By Ray Carsillo | 06/24/2014 06:26 PM PT

News

Concerning a new Bad Company installment, it’s not a matter of DICE ignoring their fanbase, they’re just unsure what made Bad Company so popular, CEO Karl-Magnus Troedsson explained in a recent interview with Eurogamer.

“Some people say they found the multiplayer controls faster and more direct,” Troedsson told Eurogamer. “Some people liked the single-player and the characters and the humor. People love different things about it. It’s starting to almost get to that place where, if we were to make a sequel to Bad Company, what would than even imply?

“It’s scary to go back and try to remake an old fan favorite when actually no-one can really put their finger on what it is people love. Bringing back the characters and creating a great single-player out of that, sure, I can understand that.

“But some people say this: the Bad Company 2 multiplayer is the best you’ve ever done. Okay, why is that? It’s hard for people to articulate what that is, which is actually hard for us. It would be hard to remake something like that. Can we do it? Of course. We have our theories when it comes to the multiplayer.”

It sounds to me—and you can call my crazy here, Karl—that both the single-player and multiplayer were so good that the Bad Company games offered different things to a multitude of players. Maybe the reason you can’t put your finger on what made it great and people keep giving you different answers is that you appealed to such a wide audience, for once, that a lot of different people found something to love. Definitely not something that can be said for Battlefield 3 or 4.

Troedsson closed by offering Bad Company fans the faintest glimmer of hope, saying the sub-brand is not dead and it can be revived—but unless it’s suddenly revealed that Preston, Sweetwater, Haggard, and Sarge have suddenly become the funniest boys in blue since Steve Gutenberg and gang in Police Academy—those fans will definitely have to wait at least a little while longer.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Ray Carsillo

view all posts

Ray has extensive roots in geek culture, as he’s written about videogames, comics, and movies for such outlets as Newsday.com, ESPNNewYork.com, Classic Game Room on YouTube, Collider.com, and Comicvine.com before finally settling into his role as EGM’s reviews editor. His main goal in life? To become king of all geek media, of course! Find him on Twitter @RayCarsillo