X
X
Epic shuts down popular Fornite leak account over more than just leaks


 

Fortnite developer Epic Games recently shut down a popular Fortnite leak account, but it wasn’t just because of the leaks.

The owner of Twitter account FNBRLeaks took down the account and deleted all its tweets after Epic sent them a cease-and-desist letter. While the account’s followers initially speculated that Epic was taking it down because of leaking gameplay elements like upcoming weaponry and skins and spoiling additions to the game, there seems to be more to the story.

According to Epic, FNBRLeaks was also promoting the sale of mods and mod tools, which happens to be a violation of Fortnite‘s terms of service.

The cease-and-desist letter, which a FNBRLeaks staff member posted to Discord, reportedly argued that that the account’s owner “spoiled the game for millions of people who play and/or watch Fortnite, and negatively impact[ed] those who work hard to create and update Fortnite. The fact that he is a teenager makes this no less true.”

However, in a follow-up statement from an Epic spokesperson, the “owner of this account and others promoted and advertised the sale of game modification tools which violate our terms of service. This is not directly related to data mining or leaking.” More specifically, the letter itself reportedly alleged that FNBRLeaks was “circumventing security measures Epic has put in place to prevent access to copyright-protected code.”

Still, data mining and leaking seems to have something to do with why Epic shut down FNBRLeaks, as the letter reportedly claims that the account owner was “misappropriating Epic’s confidential and proprietary information, which includes, without limitation, the unauthorized acquisition, disclosure and/or use, e.g. data mining by unauthorized means and ‘leaking’ prior to its intended release, of such information.”

This isn’t the first time that Epic has taken legal action against players for promoting or disseminating mods. Most recently, the publisher sued YouTuber Golden Modz for posting videos with and selling cheats on his website. Prior to that, Epic also sued a 14-year-old boy for posting “how-to” videos about cheating in Fortnite.

Meanwhile, Epic is currently on the receiving end of a lawsuit filed by rapper 2 Milly, who alleges that Epic committed copyright infringement when it used his dance, the “Milly Rock,” as an emote called without compensation or even permission.

Read More

Source: Eurogamer


About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Epic shuts down popular Fornite leak account over more than just leaks

Fortnite publisher Epic Games continues to crack down on data miners and mods in its latest cease and desist.

By Michael Goroff | 12/17/2018 11:00 AM PT

News

Fortnite developer Epic Games recently shut down a popular Fortnite leak account, but it wasn’t just because of the leaks.

The owner of Twitter account FNBRLeaks took down the account and deleted all its tweets after Epic sent them a cease-and-desist letter. While the account’s followers initially speculated that Epic was taking it down because of leaking gameplay elements like upcoming weaponry and skins and spoiling additions to the game, there seems to be more to the story.

According to Epic, FNBRLeaks was also promoting the sale of mods and mod tools, which happens to be a violation of Fortnite‘s terms of service.

The cease-and-desist letter, which a FNBRLeaks staff member posted to Discord, reportedly argued that that the account’s owner “spoiled the game for millions of people who play and/or watch Fortnite, and negatively impact[ed] those who work hard to create and update Fortnite. The fact that he is a teenager makes this no less true.”

However, in a follow-up statement from an Epic spokesperson, the “owner of this account and others promoted and advertised the sale of game modification tools which violate our terms of service. This is not directly related to data mining or leaking.” More specifically, the letter itself reportedly alleged that FNBRLeaks was “circumventing security measures Epic has put in place to prevent access to copyright-protected code.”

Still, data mining and leaking seems to have something to do with why Epic shut down FNBRLeaks, as the letter reportedly claims that the account owner was “misappropriating Epic’s confidential and proprietary information, which includes, without limitation, the unauthorized acquisition, disclosure and/or use, e.g. data mining by unauthorized means and ‘leaking’ prior to its intended release, of such information.”

This isn’t the first time that Epic has taken legal action against players for promoting or disseminating mods. Most recently, the publisher sued YouTuber Golden Modz for posting videos with and selling cheats on his website. Prior to that, Epic also sued a 14-year-old boy for posting “how-to” videos about cheating in Fortnite.

Meanwhile, Epic is currently on the receiving end of a lawsuit filed by rapper 2 Milly, who alleges that Epic committed copyright infringement when it used his dance, the “Milly Rock,” as an emote called without compensation or even permission.

Read More

Source: Eurogamer



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.