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Fallout


 

We’ve learned a lot more about Fallout 76 over the last few days, and now Bethesda has shed osme light on two major areas of the game fans are concerned about: how the endgame works, and what Bethesda has planned for microtransactions.

As it turns out, the answers lie in a documentary. Before Bethesda officially unveiled Fallout 76 to the public, Noclip went behind the scenes to create a nearly 40-minute documentary dubbed The Making of Fallout 76. In it, various Bethesda employees talk about the different design processes at work within the game, and touch on both pressing subjects.

Once players have completed most of the content in Fallout 76—that is, once they’re established in the world, fairly well geared-up, and have completed most of the quests and content—the endgame loop will become apparent. Over the course of the game, powerful creatures called Scorchbeasts crawl out of fissures in the earth. Fans who paid attention to the gameplay shown during Bethesda’s E3 conference reveal will recognize the name; that giant dragon-like mutated bat that made a brief appearance was a Scorchbeast. Players will need to gather up nuclear launch codes and send a nuclear missile flying towards the fissure the Scorchbeasts’ fissure in order to seal them away.

Launching a missile in this way will re-irradiate the earth around the detonation site, causing rare crafting materials to drop and creating even more powerful enemies in the area as animals mutate further and become stronger. Players will thus be able to become stronger themselves in order to keep up, and prepare for when the Scorchbeasts emerge again.

This cycle should also prevent a “Cold War” stalemate of certain players sitting on nuclear launch codes and not using them. Even if players don’t want to engage in PVP and nuke another player’s base, it’s still beneficial to everyone to launch a missile somewhere into the wilderness and create more high-leveled areas of the map and create the opportunity for better gear.

Bethesda also revealed that Fallout 76 will have microtransactions. As the developers explained in the documentary, the money from microtransactions will be an important part of keeping the game’s servers up and running, as well as making sure that big future updates and DLC can be made available to everyone for free. Microtransactions will be purely cosmetic, and none will be exclusive—all the cosmetics available through microtransactions can also be unlocked somewhere in the game through gameplay.

The Making of Fallout 76 goes into a lot more detail on the game, explaining some of the challenges behind turning a game oriented around the player into a game oriented around the world, and the choices that had to be made in order to keep the survival elements of the game fun while still feeling like a Fallout title.

Fallout 76 arrives on November 14th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Source: Noclip

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About Emma Schaefer

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Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Fallout 76 making-of documentary reveals endgame, microtransactions

The Making of Fallout 76 dives deep into the systems underlying Bethesda's next Fallout game.

By Emma Schaefer | 06/13/2018 11:30 AM PT

News

We’ve learned a lot more about Fallout 76 over the last few days, and now Bethesda has shed osme light on two major areas of the game fans are concerned about: how the endgame works, and what Bethesda has planned for microtransactions.

As it turns out, the answers lie in a documentary. Before Bethesda officially unveiled Fallout 76 to the public, Noclip went behind the scenes to create a nearly 40-minute documentary dubbed The Making of Fallout 76. In it, various Bethesda employees talk about the different design processes at work within the game, and touch on both pressing subjects.

Once players have completed most of the content in Fallout 76—that is, once they’re established in the world, fairly well geared-up, and have completed most of the quests and content—the endgame loop will become apparent. Over the course of the game, powerful creatures called Scorchbeasts crawl out of fissures in the earth. Fans who paid attention to the gameplay shown during Bethesda’s E3 conference reveal will recognize the name; that giant dragon-like mutated bat that made a brief appearance was a Scorchbeast. Players will need to gather up nuclear launch codes and send a nuclear missile flying towards the fissure the Scorchbeasts’ fissure in order to seal them away.

Launching a missile in this way will re-irradiate the earth around the detonation site, causing rare crafting materials to drop and creating even more powerful enemies in the area as animals mutate further and become stronger. Players will thus be able to become stronger themselves in order to keep up, and prepare for when the Scorchbeasts emerge again.

This cycle should also prevent a “Cold War” stalemate of certain players sitting on nuclear launch codes and not using them. Even if players don’t want to engage in PVP and nuke another player’s base, it’s still beneficial to everyone to launch a missile somewhere into the wilderness and create more high-leveled areas of the map and create the opportunity for better gear.

Bethesda also revealed that Fallout 76 will have microtransactions. As the developers explained in the documentary, the money from microtransactions will be an important part of keeping the game’s servers up and running, as well as making sure that big future updates and DLC can be made available to everyone for free. Microtransactions will be purely cosmetic, and none will be exclusive—all the cosmetics available through microtransactions can also be unlocked somewhere in the game through gameplay.

The Making of Fallout 76 goes into a lot more detail on the game, explaining some of the challenges behind turning a game oriented around the player into a game oriented around the world, and the choices that had to be made in order to keep the survival elements of the game fun while still feeling like a Fallout title.

Fallout 76 arrives on November 14th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Source: Noclip

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM