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Fallout


 

Bethesda has finally unveiled the details on Fallout 76.

The game has confirmed to be an open world survival game, set in West Virginia before any of the other Fallout games take place. As a resident of Vault 76, you’re one of the first to emerge into the world from the vaults—and other, real live people, will emerge into the world alongside you.

The game won’t be an MMO, as game director Todd Howard explained on stage during Bethesda’s E3 presentation. Instead of interacting with hundreds or thousands of players, you’ll interact with dozens only, letting you get to know your neighbors and play directly with your friends. You can play solo as well, and all of your progress carries over no matter where you play.

The building and Workshop system from Fallout 4 have taken new life in Fallout 76 in the form of C.A.M.P units, or Construction and Assembly Mobile Platforms. These mobile homes let players craft and customize their bases however they want, though they aren’t entirely safe from outside attacks.

There are a huge new range of threats to deal with, including enemies inspired by the local myths of West Virginia, fellow survivors who may attack you, and even additional nuclear missiles. Players can battle for control of different nuclear missile sites scattered around the map. In order to launch a missile, players will have to assemble the entire nuclear code—but once assembled, that code will work to launch a nuclear missile wherever you want, letting you take out a settlement or another player’s C.A.M.P. The radioactive impact site will provide additional materials to craft with, though, naturally, these materials will be radioactive.

Thankfully, dying won’t reset your progress. Howard described the game as “soft-core survival” rather than “hard-core,” meaning that even if you die, you won’t lose progress. That can come in handy if you end up with neighbors who are determined to hunt you down.

If you end up working together with your neighbors, however, there are a few other features to take advantage of. A new photo mode will let players pose together after an impressive kill, and players can combine their resources to try and take down giant mutated bats and sloths.

A beta test for Fallout 76 is coming prior to the game’s launch, so fans will have a chance to put the game through its paces a little early.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Read More

Source: Bethesda Conference E3


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Fallout 76 reveals online multiplayer survival gameplay, release date

Bethesda has spilled all of Fallout 76's secrets.

By Emma Schaefer | 06/10/2018 07:59 PM PT | Updated 06/11/2018 05:35 PM PT

News

Bethesda has finally unveiled the details on Fallout 76.

The game has confirmed to be an open world survival game, set in West Virginia before any of the other Fallout games take place. As a resident of Vault 76, you’re one of the first to emerge into the world from the vaults—and other, real live people, will emerge into the world alongside you.

The game won’t be an MMO, as game director Todd Howard explained on stage during Bethesda’s E3 presentation. Instead of interacting with hundreds or thousands of players, you’ll interact with dozens only, letting you get to know your neighbors and play directly with your friends. You can play solo as well, and all of your progress carries over no matter where you play.

The building and Workshop system from Fallout 4 have taken new life in Fallout 76 in the form of C.A.M.P units, or Construction and Assembly Mobile Platforms. These mobile homes let players craft and customize their bases however they want, though they aren’t entirely safe from outside attacks.

There are a huge new range of threats to deal with, including enemies inspired by the local myths of West Virginia, fellow survivors who may attack you, and even additional nuclear missiles. Players can battle for control of different nuclear missile sites scattered around the map. In order to launch a missile, players will have to assemble the entire nuclear code—but once assembled, that code will work to launch a nuclear missile wherever you want, letting you take out a settlement or another player’s C.A.M.P. The radioactive impact site will provide additional materials to craft with, though, naturally, these materials will be radioactive.

Thankfully, dying won’t reset your progress. Howard described the game as “soft-core survival” rather than “hard-core,” meaning that even if you die, you won’t lose progress. That can come in handy if you end up with neighbors who are determined to hunt you down.

If you end up working together with your neighbors, however, there are a few other features to take advantage of. A new photo mode will let players pose together after an impressive kill, and players can combine their resources to try and take down giant mutated bats and sloths.

A beta test for Fallout 76 is coming prior to the game’s launch, so fans will have a chance to put the game through its paces a little early.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14th for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Read More

Source: Bethesda Conference E3



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM