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Fallout


 

The launch of Fallout 76 has already been plagued with a broken beta that deleted game files from users’ computers, game-breaking bugs, and controversies surrounding misleading marketing over a “canvas” bag in the collector’s edition of the game. Now, though, Fallout 76 players are facing a whole new issue, and it’s far worse than any of the others.

A data protection breach exposing users’ names, email accounts, addresses, and—in some cases—partial credit card information is the latest problem to plague Fallout 76, and the ramifications could be quite serious.

The data breach occurred with customers who had open support tickets with Bethesda. Given the number of bugs and customer complaints surrounding the game’s launch, that’s a lot of people. Some customers who opened tickets were sent the full support tickets of other customers, including all of the information on those users’ accounts.

Some users on Twitter provided immediate screenshot proof to Bethesda support, while one user on Reddit reported seeing partial credit card information.

Bethesda acknowledged the data breach in a statement on Twitter.

“We experienced an error with our customer support website that allowed some customers to view support tickets submitted by a limited number of other customers during a brief exposure window,” the statement reads. “Upon discovery, we immediately took down the website to fix the error.

“We are still investigating the incident and will provide additional updates as we learn more. During the incident it appears that the user name, name, contact information, and proof of purchase information provided by a limited number of customers on their support ticket requests, may have been viewable by other customers accessing the customer support website for a limited time, but no full credit card numbers or passwords were disclosed. We plan to notify customers who may have been impacted.

“Bethesda takes the privacy of our customers seriously, and we sincerely apologize for this situation.”

In other words, if you had a ticket open, it’s likely your name, user name, and address, at minimum, have been leaked to the world. Passwords and full credit cards should be safe, but it may be wise to change passwords and keep an eye on your bank account for the time being.

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Source: Bethesda Support


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Fallout 76 support may have exposed your personal information

The latest bug surrounding Fallout 76 exposed the names, addresses, and other personal information of some players.

By Emma Schaefer | 12/6/2018 04:00 PM PT

News

The launch of Fallout 76 has already been plagued with a broken beta that deleted game files from users’ computers, game-breaking bugs, and controversies surrounding misleading marketing over a “canvas” bag in the collector’s edition of the game. Now, though, Fallout 76 players are facing a whole new issue, and it’s far worse than any of the others.

A data protection breach exposing users’ names, email accounts, addresses, and—in some cases—partial credit card information is the latest problem to plague Fallout 76, and the ramifications could be quite serious.

The data breach occurred with customers who had open support tickets with Bethesda. Given the number of bugs and customer complaints surrounding the game’s launch, that’s a lot of people. Some customers who opened tickets were sent the full support tickets of other customers, including all of the information on those users’ accounts.

Some users on Twitter provided immediate screenshot proof to Bethesda support, while one user on Reddit reported seeing partial credit card information.

Bethesda acknowledged the data breach in a statement on Twitter.

“We experienced an error with our customer support website that allowed some customers to view support tickets submitted by a limited number of other customers during a brief exposure window,” the statement reads. “Upon discovery, we immediately took down the website to fix the error.

“We are still investigating the incident and will provide additional updates as we learn more. During the incident it appears that the user name, name, contact information, and proof of purchase information provided by a limited number of customers on their support ticket requests, may have been viewable by other customers accessing the customer support website for a limited time, but no full credit card numbers or passwords were disclosed. We plan to notify customers who may have been impacted.

“Bethesda takes the privacy of our customers seriously, and we sincerely apologize for this situation.”

In other words, if you had a ticket open, it’s likely your name, user name, and address, at minimum, have been leaked to the world. Passwords and full credit cards should be safe, but it may be wise to change passwords and keep an eye on your bank account for the time being.

Read More

Source: Bethesda Support



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM