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Although you can play Star Wars Episode 1: Racer with two Nintendo 64 controllers, one industrious modder found a way to combine two of them into one massive peripheral piece. It results in probably the largest N64 controller known to date, but more impressively, it actually seems to make the game in question more realistic to play.

Hack-A-Day spotted the custom modification, created by British Nintendo fan “Clarky” and posted on his YouTube channel.

According the commentary in the video page, Clarky used a combination of “super glue, epoxy, fibreglass” and car filler to smooth out all the rough plastic casing.

It’s far from his first mod creation though, as Clarky has also slapped together an impressively built (but aerodynamically impractical) “Slim” Nintendo 64, plus a couple of interesting miniature remodels. They’ve since been sold, for what we can only assume were massive amounts of money.

Source: Hack-A-Day

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Freaky N64 Controller Hack Provides Custom Star Wars: Racer Gameplay

Although you can play Star Wars Episode 1: Racer with two Nintendo 64 controllers, one industrious modder found a way to combine two of them into one massive peripheral piece.

By EGM Staff | 08/6/2012 03:22 PM PT

News

Although you can play Star Wars Episode 1: Racer with two Nintendo 64 controllers, one industrious modder found a way to combine two of them into one massive peripheral piece. It results in probably the largest N64 controller known to date, but more impressively, it actually seems to make the game in question more realistic to play.

Hack-A-Day spotted the custom modification, created by British Nintendo fan “Clarky” and posted on his YouTube channel.

According the commentary in the video page, Clarky used a combination of “super glue, epoxy, fibreglass” and car filler to smooth out all the rough plastic casing.

It’s far from his first mod creation though, as Clarky has also slapped together an impressively built (but aerodynamically impractical) “Slim” Nintendo 64, plus a couple of interesting miniature remodels. They’ve since been sold, for what we can only assume were massive amounts of money.

Source: Hack-A-Day

0   POINTS
0   POINTS