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BioShock Infinite designer Ken Levine took to Twitter earlier today to state that the gender gap in this business is “terrible for the industry.”

Ken Levine posted the following via Twitter:

“a) The gender gap in the industry is terrible for the industry

“b) to work on the problem, we need to have an understanding of the problem.

“c) The first step is research that doesn’t ignore basic statistical standards? (small sample sizes, self-reporting, experience x ref).

“Probably statistically safe to say 50% of potential game talent is female (adjust for nurture issues). Long way to go, but need good data.”

Levine’s words follow in the wake of continuing discussions about the need for the videogame industry to be more inclusive—a fact recently highlighted by a recent Game Developer magazine survey that as of 2012, women still make less than their male counterparts in every game development position but programming, and only make up 23% of the industry as compared to the overwhelming male majority at 77 percent.

Gender Gap in Games Industry ‘Terrible’ Says Ken Levine

By | 04/5/2013 04:25 PM PT

News

BioShock Infinite designer Ken Levine took to Twitter earlier today to state that the gender gap in this business is “terrible for the industry.”

Ken Levine posted the following via Twitter:

“a) The gender gap in the industry is terrible for the industry

“b) to work on the problem, we need to have an understanding of the problem.

“c) The first step is research that doesn’t ignore basic statistical standards? (small sample sizes, self-reporting, experience x ref).

“Probably statistically safe to say 50% of potential game talent is female (adjust for nurture issues). Long way to go, but need good data.”

Levine’s words follow in the wake of continuing discussions about the need for the videogame industry to be more inclusive—a fact recently highlighted by a recent Game Developer magazine survey that as of 2012, women still make less than their male counterparts in every game development position but programming, and only make up 23% of the industry as compared to the overwhelming male majority at 77 percent.

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