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Grand Theft Auto


 

Grand Theft Auto V developer Rockstar Games has finally revealed why players haven’t seen any single-player DLC for the crime sandbox game—and why they never will.

Both Grand Theft Auto IV and Red Dead Redemption supported massive post-launch expansions that introduced a breadth of new single-player content. The success of these expansions lead most fans to expect similar single-player support for GTA V, but after more than four years on the market, only the game’s multiplayer experience—GTA Online—has seen any appreciable evolution. In a recent interview with Game Informer, director of design Imran Sarwar was asked if it was a “tough decision” to move away from the scripted, single-player expansions found in previous Rockstar experiences.

“No, it was not really a conscious decision, it’s just what happened,” Sarwar explained. “We would love to do more single-player add-ons for games in the future. As a company we love single-player more than anything, and believe in it absolutely—for storytelling and a sense of immersion in a world, multiplayer games don’t rival single-player games. With GTA V, the single-player game was absolutely massive and very, very complete. It was three games in one. The next-gen versions took a year of everyone’s time to get right, then the online component had a lot of potential, but to come close to realizing that potential also sucked up a lot of resources.”

Sarwar went on to explain that the development of the upcoming Red Dead Redemption 2 also played a significant role in the developer’s limited flexibility. The pressure of additional responsibilities lead Rockstar to feel that GTA V single-player expansions weren’t “either possible or necessary”, although Sarwar suggested that future projects could still see such support. GTA V‘s narrative may no longer the developer’s focus, but the studio doesn’t value the importance of single-player experiences any less.

“At Rockstar, we will always have bandwidth issues because we are perfectionists and to make huge complex games takes a lot of time and resources.” Sarwar said. “Not everything is always possible, but we still love single-player open-world games more than anything. I don’t think you could make a game like GTA V if you did not like single-player games and trying to expand their possibilities!”

While there may be no GTA V single-player content in our future, Rockstar continues to support the game’s online component with new and creative content, such as the recently released Transform Races. According to Sarwar, Rockstar has no fixed end point in mind for GTA Online, although future updates may attempt to shift people over to Red Dead Redemption 2 when it drops sometime in spring of next year.

Read More

Source: Game Informer


About Nick Plessas

view all posts

Nick didn’t start gaming until mid-2006. Once his parents finally allowed a console into the house, it was all uphill from there. Starting out with a PS2, he grew an affinity for Sony consoles and moved on to the PS3, and now the PS4. He keeps his gaming palette wide, but, gun to his head, he’d have to say shooters are his genre of choice. Find him on Twitter @idole808

GTA V’s single-player DLC is officially dead—here’s why

The explanation for Grand Theft Auto V's lack of single-player DLC doesn't make it sting any less.

By Nick Plessas | 10/23/2017 12:30 PM PT

News

Grand Theft Auto V developer Rockstar Games has finally revealed why players haven’t seen any single-player DLC for the crime sandbox game—and why they never will.

Both Grand Theft Auto IV and Red Dead Redemption supported massive post-launch expansions that introduced a breadth of new single-player content. The success of these expansions lead most fans to expect similar single-player support for GTA V, but after more than four years on the market, only the game’s multiplayer experience—GTA Online—has seen any appreciable evolution. In a recent interview with Game Informer, director of design Imran Sarwar was asked if it was a “tough decision” to move away from the scripted, single-player expansions found in previous Rockstar experiences.

“No, it was not really a conscious decision, it’s just what happened,” Sarwar explained. “We would love to do more single-player add-ons for games in the future. As a company we love single-player more than anything, and believe in it absolutely—for storytelling and a sense of immersion in a world, multiplayer games don’t rival single-player games. With GTA V, the single-player game was absolutely massive and very, very complete. It was three games in one. The next-gen versions took a year of everyone’s time to get right, then the online component had a lot of potential, but to come close to realizing that potential also sucked up a lot of resources.”

Sarwar went on to explain that the development of the upcoming Red Dead Redemption 2 also played a significant role in the developer’s limited flexibility. The pressure of additional responsibilities lead Rockstar to feel that GTA V single-player expansions weren’t “either possible or necessary”, although Sarwar suggested that future projects could still see such support. GTA V‘s narrative may no longer the developer’s focus, but the studio doesn’t value the importance of single-player experiences any less.

“At Rockstar, we will always have bandwidth issues because we are perfectionists and to make huge complex games takes a lot of time and resources.” Sarwar said. “Not everything is always possible, but we still love single-player open-world games more than anything. I don’t think you could make a game like GTA V if you did not like single-player games and trying to expand their possibilities!”

While there may be no GTA V single-player content in our future, Rockstar continues to support the game’s online component with new and creative content, such as the recently released Transform Races. According to Sarwar, Rockstar has no fixed end point in mind for GTA Online, although future updates may attempt to shift people over to Red Dead Redemption 2 when it drops sometime in spring of next year.

Read More

Source: Game Informer



About Nick Plessas

view all posts

Nick didn’t start gaming until mid-2006. Once his parents finally allowed a console into the house, it was all uphill from there. Starting out with a PS2, he grew an affinity for Sony consoles and moved on to the PS3, and now the PS4. He keeps his gaming palette wide, but, gun to his head, he’d have to say shooters are his genre of choice. Find him on Twitter @idole808