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If Halo series executive producer Kiki Wolfkill has her way, the future of the franchise will transformed into something “even more experiential,” the 343 Industries higher-up told Microsoft in a recent profile.

“If you had told me 10 years ago that one day I’d help make Halo 4, I would have never believed you,” Wolfkill said. “I have never been career focused in the classic sense. I’m more about, is what I’m doing interesting? Is it challenging? if not, then what’s next?”

Most immediately apparent, of course, is the transmedia presence Halo continues to build. Beyond the popular books and graphic novels, the series will finally see a full-length digital feature debut this fall: Halo: Nightfall, a Ridley Scott–produced film that will feature a character set to play a prominent role in next year’s Halo 5: Guardians. But Nightfall is a static, passive form of Halo. Wolfkill’s hope, she alludes, is to find something “more experiential” between the two extremes.

“Our next step is to try and make the connections between the game and its linear entertainment aspects even more experiential,” said Wolfkill. “I want to transform how people experience Halo in their living rooms and on their PCs,” noting, however, that the company “will never do anything that doesn’t move the universe forward. We won’t do something for the sake of being in a certain medium.”

Halo: The Master Chief collection, which includes Halo: Nightfall, launches on Xbox One November 11 in North America, November 14 in the U.K. Halo 5: Guardians will no doubt similarly arrive Q3 or Q4 of 2015.

Halo series producer hopes to ‘transform how people experience’ the franchise

By | 07/30/2014 01:55 PM PT

News

If Halo series executive producer Kiki Wolfkill has her way, the future of the franchise will transformed into something “even more experiential,” the 343 Industries higher-up told Microsoft in a recent profile.

“If you had told me 10 years ago that one day I’d help make Halo 4, I would have never believed you,” Wolfkill said. “I have never been career focused in the classic sense. I’m more about, is what I’m doing interesting? Is it challenging? if not, then what’s next?”

Most immediately apparent, of course, is the transmedia presence Halo continues to build. Beyond the popular books and graphic novels, the series will finally see a full-length digital feature debut this fall: Halo: Nightfall, a Ridley Scott–produced film that will feature a character set to play a prominent role in next year’s Halo 5: Guardians. But Nightfall is a static, passive form of Halo. Wolfkill’s hope, she alludes, is to find something “more experiential” between the two extremes.

“Our next step is to try and make the connections between the game and its linear entertainment aspects even more experiential,” said Wolfkill. “I want to transform how people experience Halo in their living rooms and on their PCs,” noting, however, that the company “will never do anything that doesn’t move the universe forward. We won’t do something for the sake of being in a certain medium.”

Halo: The Master Chief collection, which includes Halo: Nightfall, launches on Xbox One November 11 in North America, November 14 in the U.K. Halo 5: Guardians will no doubt similarly arrive Q3 or Q4 of 2015.

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