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According to a patent filed by Sony in June 2012, there may be a new iteration of the PlayStation Move controller in the works.

The recently published document, discovered by CVG, describes an updated Move wand with a handful of minor revisions, the most notable of which is the addition of a flat touch surface to the top of the device. According to the text of the patent, the touch surface provides a more intuitive and accurate control

“In a traditional joystick,” the paper reads, “it’s hard to keep a user’s thumb still while the user provides input by engaging various motions with the joystick. This is due to the fact that in the joystick, the thumb’s support moves. However, using a touch input surface, the thumb can be kept still while continuing to provide the user’s input by pressing on the input surface.”

The language makes it unclear whether any next-gen Move controller would interface with a second controller featuring an analog stick—like the current-gen’s navigation controller—or whether this one touchpad/button configuration would need to do everything by itself.

The PS3-era Move is the only prior controller that’s compatible with the PlayStation 4, so it had been doubtful that the peripheral would be seeing an update this generation. Indeed, this patent may still never see light of day as a finished product. But if Sony does decide to make another big push into motion gaming with an updated Move, it’s safe to assume it’ll look at least somewhat like this design.

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About Josh Harmon

view all posts

Josh picked up a controller when he was 3 years old—and he hasn’t looked back since. This has made him particularly vulnerable to attacks from behind. He joined EGM as an intern following a brief-but-storied career on a number of small gaming blogs across the Internet. Find him on Twitter @jorshy

Is This the Next PlayStation Move Controller?

By Josh Harmon | 12/10/2013 01:35 PM PT

News

According to a patent filed by Sony in June 2012, there may be a new iteration of the PlayStation Move controller in the works.

The recently published document, discovered by CVG, describes an updated Move wand with a handful of minor revisions, the most notable of which is the addition of a flat touch surface to the top of the device. According to the text of the patent, the touch surface provides a more intuitive and accurate control

“In a traditional joystick,” the paper reads, “it’s hard to keep a user’s thumb still while the user provides input by engaging various motions with the joystick. This is due to the fact that in the joystick, the thumb’s support moves. However, using a touch input surface, the thumb can be kept still while continuing to provide the user’s input by pressing on the input surface.”

The language makes it unclear whether any next-gen Move controller would interface with a second controller featuring an analog stick—like the current-gen’s navigation controller—or whether this one touchpad/button configuration would need to do everything by itself.

The PS3-era Move is the only prior controller that’s compatible with the PlayStation 4, so it had been doubtful that the peripheral would be seeing an update this generation. Indeed, this patent may still never see light of day as a finished product. But if Sony does decide to make another big push into motion gaming with an updated Move, it’s safe to assume it’ll look at least somewhat like this design.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Josh Harmon

view all posts

Josh picked up a controller when he was 3 years old—and he hasn’t looked back since. This has made him particularly vulnerable to attacks from behind. He joined EGM as an intern following a brief-but-storied career on a number of small gaming blogs across the Internet. Find him on Twitter @jorshy