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Speaking to Edge, long-time Zelda series director and producer Eiji Aonuma said that the sequel to the SNES smash hit will run at 60 frames per second and contain “a big surprise” at the start of the game.

“This new title will feature lots of things that are new to the series; right at the start of the game, there’s a big surprise that will shock players,” Aonuma told Edge. “We started out with the new play mechanics, such as Link being able to become a painting and walk along the walls, and then inured out from there how to build a story around them. Rather than forcing elements of the original story into this one, we’ve instead focused on bringing back the characters, so you can see what happened to them after the events of the first game.”

Aonuma also expressed to Edge his interest at doing something new. He indicated he only has “about ten more years” to make games at Nintendo, and wants to spend that time developing something new  to avoid ending his career having only worked on Zelda games.

Link to the Past 2 to Feature ‘Big Surprise’ at Start of Game

By | 06/6/2013 01:21 PM PT

News

Speaking to Edge, long-time Zelda series director and producer Eiji Aonuma said that the sequel to the SNES smash hit will run at 60 frames per second and contain “a big surprise” at the start of the game.

“This new title will feature lots of things that are new to the series; right at the start of the game, there’s a big surprise that will shock players,” Aonuma told Edge. “We started out with the new play mechanics, such as Link being able to become a painting and walk along the walls, and then inured out from there how to build a story around them. Rather than forcing elements of the original story into this one, we’ve instead focused on bringing back the characters, so you can see what happened to them after the events of the first game.”

Aonuma also expressed to Edge his interest at doing something new. He indicated he only has “about ten more years” to make games at Nintendo, and wants to spend that time developing something new  to avoid ending his career having only worked on Zelda games.

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