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Microsoft has submitted a patent for what is being described as a “head-mounted display,” which appears to work similar to the Oculus Rift or Google Glass.

The multiplayer gaming headset would use voice recognition, eye-tracking, facial recognition, accelerometers, and gyroscopes, to allow players to engage in games with other users anywhere in the world.

The actual patent was filed back in 2012, but was only made public last week. It suggests that Microsoft isn’t looking to just extend the gaming experience, but is allowing users to game whenever and wherever they want–providing that someone else in the area is wearing the glasses.

When asked about the patent a Microsoft representative told The Verge that, “Not all patents applied for or received will be incorporated into a Microsoft product.”

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About Matthew Bennett

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Matt is one of the longest-serving members of the EGMNOW team. An ability to go many hours without sleep and a quick wit make him ideal for his role as associate editor at EGMNOW.com. He often thinks back to the days when the very idea of this career seemed like nothing but an impossible dream. Find him on Twitter @mattyjb89

Microsoft Patent Application Details Augmented Reality 3D Gaming Headset

By Matthew Bennett | 08/5/2013 10:26 AM PT

News

Microsoft has submitted a patent for what is being described as a “head-mounted display,” which appears to work similar to the Oculus Rift or Google Glass.

The multiplayer gaming headset would use voice recognition, eye-tracking, facial recognition, accelerometers, and gyroscopes, to allow players to engage in games with other users anywhere in the world.

The actual patent was filed back in 2012, but was only made public last week. It suggests that Microsoft isn’t looking to just extend the gaming experience, but is allowing users to game whenever and wherever they want–providing that someone else in the area is wearing the glasses.

When asked about the patent a Microsoft representative told The Verge that, “Not all patents applied for or received will be incorporated into a Microsoft product.”

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Matthew Bennett

view all posts

Matt is one of the longest-serving members of the EGMNOW team. An ability to go many hours without sleep and a quick wit make him ideal for his role as associate editor at EGMNOW.com. He often thinks back to the days when the very idea of this career seemed like nothing but an impossible dream. Find him on Twitter @mattyjb89