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Appearing on Larry Hyrb/Major Nelson’s podcast, Xbox One’s chief product officer Marc Whitten confirmed that Microsoft is boosting the console’s GPU speed leading up to launch.

According to Whitten, the Xbox One’s GPU clock speed now runs at 853 MHz, an increase from the console’s initial 800 MHz.

“You sort of start with the base [DirectX] driver, then you take out all parts that don’t look like Xbox One and you add in everything that really, really, optimizes that experience,” Whitten explained on the podcast. “And almost all of our content partners have really picked it up now, and it’s really, I think, made a really nice improvement. It’s really cool.”

Whitten describes the optimized “mono driver” graphics software as just one of the ways Microsoft is “tweaking the knobs” to improve the console’s hardware performance.

“Just an example of how you really start landing the program as you get closer to launch,” he added.

The Xbox One is set to hit store shelves sometime in November, priced at $499.

Microsoft’s Marc Whitten Confirms Xbox One Over-Clocked GPU Speed

By | 08/2/2013 12:52 PM PT

News

Appearing on Larry Hyrb/Major Nelson’s podcast, Xbox One’s chief product officer Marc Whitten confirmed that Microsoft is boosting the console’s GPU speed leading up to launch.

According to Whitten, the Xbox One’s GPU clock speed now runs at 853 MHz, an increase from the console’s initial 800 MHz.

“You sort of start with the base [DirectX] driver, then you take out all parts that don’t look like Xbox One and you add in everything that really, really, optimizes that experience,” Whitten explained on the podcast. “And almost all of our content partners have really picked it up now, and it’s really, I think, made a really nice improvement. It’s really cool.”

Whitten describes the optimized “mono driver” graphics software as just one of the ways Microsoft is “tweaking the knobs” to improve the console’s hardware performance.

“Just an example of how you really start landing the program as you get closer to launch,” he added.

The Xbox One is set to hit store shelves sometime in November, priced at $499.

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