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Misfits Attic, the indie developer behind the puzzle game A Virus Named Tom, has worked with the Indie Fund and some of the most recognizable names in indie development to secure funding for their next project, Duskers.

You might recall reading about Duskers on here before. I’ve covered it a few times—first as one of the standout titles I saw at this year’s GDC, then during an interview with its creator, Tim Keenan.

At the time we spoke, Keenan wasn’t certain he’d been able to find the money needed to turn his prototype into a finished game. The concept, after all, is a bit out there. You take on the role of interstellar scavenger, stranded in the depths of the space and hurting for resources. To survive, you need to explore derelict ships for supplies by sending out drones. The big catch? You can’t control them directly. Instead, you need to issue orders using a command-line interface.

Not exactly accessible, but enticing enough for an impressive group of backers, including the Indie Fund, Team Meat’s Tommy Refenes, 2D Boy’s Ron Carmel, Wolfire’s Jeffrey Rosen, and Kellee Santiago, formerly of thatgamecompany. You can read the whole heartwarming story of how it happened over on Gamasutra or the Misfits Attic blog, if you’re into that sort of thing.

If, on the other hand, you’re just interested in finding out more about Duskers, you can head over to its brand-new official website. If you like what you see, you can pre-order the game for access to the Steam alpha as soon as it’s ready.

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About Josh Harmon

view all posts

Josh picked up a controller when he was 3 years old—and he hasn’t looked back since. This has made him particularly vulnerable to attacks from behind. He joined EGM as an intern following a brief-but-storied career on a number of small gaming blogs across the Internet. Find him on Twitter @jorshy

Misfits Attic’s sci-fi roguelike Duskers secures funding from indie heavy hitters

By Josh Harmon | 08/6/2014 04:26 PM PT

News

Misfits Attic, the indie developer behind the puzzle game A Virus Named Tom, has worked with the Indie Fund and some of the most recognizable names in indie development to secure funding for their next project, Duskers.

You might recall reading about Duskers on here before. I’ve covered it a few times—first as one of the standout titles I saw at this year’s GDC, then during an interview with its creator, Tim Keenan.

At the time we spoke, Keenan wasn’t certain he’d been able to find the money needed to turn his prototype into a finished game. The concept, after all, is a bit out there. You take on the role of interstellar scavenger, stranded in the depths of the space and hurting for resources. To survive, you need to explore derelict ships for supplies by sending out drones. The big catch? You can’t control them directly. Instead, you need to issue orders using a command-line interface.

Not exactly accessible, but enticing enough for an impressive group of backers, including the Indie Fund, Team Meat’s Tommy Refenes, 2D Boy’s Ron Carmel, Wolfire’s Jeffrey Rosen, and Kellee Santiago, formerly of thatgamecompany. You can read the whole heartwarming story of how it happened over on Gamasutra or the Misfits Attic blog, if you’re into that sort of thing.

If, on the other hand, you’re just interested in finding out more about Duskers, you can head over to its brand-new official website. If you like what you see, you can pre-order the game for access to the Steam alpha as soon as it’s ready.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Josh Harmon

view all posts

Josh picked up a controller when he was 3 years old—and he hasn’t looked back since. This has made him particularly vulnerable to attacks from behind. He joined EGM as an intern following a brief-but-storied career on a number of small gaming blogs across the Internet. Find him on Twitter @jorshy