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A core part of Monster Hunter gameplay is unlocking better gear in order to kill bigger and cooler monsters, and some developers might see this as a prime opportunity to add improved gear to loot boxes and microtransactions. Now, though, the Monster Hunter series producer has come out against such practices, saying that it just “doesn’t make any sense” for the game.

Speaking in an interview with Trusted Reviews, series producer Ryozo Tsujimoto explained that there won’t be any purchasable gear obtainable in the upcoming Monster Hunter: World. The game highly incentivizes players to get better gear, true—but allowing them to outright pay for gear would defeat the entire purpose of the game.

“This is a co-op game and you’re going out in up to four-people parties,” said Tsujimoto (via a translator). “The idea is that there’s a harmony in the four players going out and you’re going to get on well together. If you feel someone hasn’t earned what they’ve got or they’ve got a better weapon just because they paid for it and you worked for yours, that creates friction.”

While the game will have a few cosmetic microtransactions, Tsujimto emphasized that they’re “just stuff that’s a bit of fun,” nothing that will affect gameplay or make players feel like others are doing better just because they paid more.

The same rules apply even if you’re playing alone. “Even when you get to a certain wall and you’re like, ‘OK, I’m 10 hours in, I suddenly have a monster I can’t beat,’ it’s not about ‘well I’ll just throw a bit of money in and I’ll get better gear to do it,'” Tsujimoto explained. “What we want you to do is go back to your house and be like ‘well, I’ve been using the great sword, maybe I need to use the dual blades for this monster.’

“We want you to go in and, through gameplay, find out what’s causing you to hit this hurdle and figure it out. Whenever you get over that hurdle by yourself, it’s such a great feeling. Why would we let you skip that just to make a bit of extra money? It doesn’t make any sense. There’s no way we would interrupt that flow.”

It definitely seems like the Monster Hunter: World team has taken the widespread backlash against microtransactions to heart. We’ll have to see how players rise to the challenge without purchasable gear options to rely on.

Monster Hunter: World releases on the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 on January 26th. The PC release is still quite a ways away, with an expected release in Fall 2018.

Source: Trusted Reviews

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About Emma Schaefer

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Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Monster Hunter: World dev reveals game’s stance on microtransactions

Monster Hunter: World has a good reason for shying away from loot boxes.

By Emma Schaefer | 01/12/2018 01:30 PM PT

News

A core part of Monster Hunter gameplay is unlocking better gear in order to kill bigger and cooler monsters, and some developers might see this as a prime opportunity to add improved gear to loot boxes and microtransactions. Now, though, the Monster Hunter series producer has come out against such practices, saying that it just “doesn’t make any sense” for the game.

Speaking in an interview with Trusted Reviews, series producer Ryozo Tsujimoto explained that there won’t be any purchasable gear obtainable in the upcoming Monster Hunter: World. The game highly incentivizes players to get better gear, true—but allowing them to outright pay for gear would defeat the entire purpose of the game.

“This is a co-op game and you’re going out in up to four-people parties,” said Tsujimoto (via a translator). “The idea is that there’s a harmony in the four players going out and you’re going to get on well together. If you feel someone hasn’t earned what they’ve got or they’ve got a better weapon just because they paid for it and you worked for yours, that creates friction.”

While the game will have a few cosmetic microtransactions, Tsujimto emphasized that they’re “just stuff that’s a bit of fun,” nothing that will affect gameplay or make players feel like others are doing better just because they paid more.

The same rules apply even if you’re playing alone. “Even when you get to a certain wall and you’re like, ‘OK, I’m 10 hours in, I suddenly have a monster I can’t beat,’ it’s not about ‘well I’ll just throw a bit of money in and I’ll get better gear to do it,'” Tsujimoto explained. “What we want you to do is go back to your house and be like ‘well, I’ve been using the great sword, maybe I need to use the dual blades for this monster.’

“We want you to go in and, through gameplay, find out what’s causing you to hit this hurdle and figure it out. Whenever you get over that hurdle by yourself, it’s such a great feeling. Why would we let you skip that just to make a bit of extra money? It doesn’t make any sense. There’s no way we would interrupt that flow.”

It definitely seems like the Monster Hunter: World team has taken the widespread backlash against microtransactions to heart. We’ll have to see how players rise to the challenge without purchasable gear options to rely on.

Monster Hunter: World releases on the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 on January 26th. The PC release is still quite a ways away, with an expected release in Fall 2018.

Source: Trusted Reviews

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About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM