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Microsoft has introduced a new logo for their company, following the “metro” look that has outlined their surging brand reinvention. It’s not a huge shift for the common consumer, but for Microsoft, it presents something significant.

In a way, it all ties back to information found in the leak of alleged Microsoft documents earlier this year, where a detailed roadmap outlined how Microsoft intended to condense Windows, Xbox Live, and Kinect into a single suite.

But will all the products have the same interface design?

Maybe—it’s just like the “ecosystem” concept that governs Apple’s Mac, MacBook, iPhone, and iPad products, where Mac OS X and iOS sync all the products together in a single unified system for consuming video, games, and more.

Not only does the logo look sharper, but the “metro” tile design is direct reference to the aesthetic seen on Windows 8 PCs, Microsoft’s Surface tablets, Windows Phones, and the Xbox 360 console.

In the long run, it’s a small but important step for Microsoft, as well as a necessary move towards attempting to dominate your living room—and maybe we’ll see the idea pushed even further with the Xbox 720’s upcoming launch.

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New Microsoft Logo Highlights Small Step To Windows, Xbox 360 Integration

Microsoft has introduced a new logo for their company, following the "metro" look that has outlined their surging brand reinvention. It's not a huge shift for the common consumer, but for Microsoft, it presents something significant.

By EGM Staff | 08/23/2012 06:54 PM PT

News

Microsoft has introduced a new logo for their company, following the “metro” look that has outlined their surging brand reinvention. It’s not a huge shift for the common consumer, but for Microsoft, it presents something significant.

In a way, it all ties back to information found in the leak of alleged Microsoft documents earlier this year, where a detailed roadmap outlined how Microsoft intended to condense Windows, Xbox Live, and Kinect into a single suite.

But will all the products have the same interface design?

Maybe—it’s just like the “ecosystem” concept that governs Apple’s Mac, MacBook, iPhone, and iPad products, where Mac OS X and iOS sync all the products together in a single unified system for consuming video, games, and more.

Not only does the logo look sharper, but the “metro” tile design is direct reference to the aesthetic seen on Windows 8 PCs, Microsoft’s Surface tablets, Windows Phones, and the Xbox 360 console.

In the long run, it’s a small but important step for Microsoft, as well as a necessary move towards attempting to dominate your living room—and maybe we’ll see the idea pushed even further with the Xbox 720’s upcoming launch.

0   POINTS
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