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NeverDead is like Katamari Damacy, except instead of rolling up candy or kittens or chairs, you’re rolling up pieces of your dismembered body.

Okay, maybe the game isn’t exactly like that—but it’s hard not to think that thought at first. I got the chance to watch a bit of the game yesterday at it was played at the EGM offices, and it’s hard to not at least get a kick out of the concept.

The game’s protagonist Bryce Boltzmann—you’ve gotta love video game protagonist names—was cursed with immortality by the demon king Astaroth, and now finds himself living out his life as a bounty hunter/gun for hire of sorts.

Bryce’s immortality is what gives the game its most unique aspect. As you’re taking hits from enemy fire or melee attacks, receive enough damage and your limbs will be knocked off one-by-one. It’s the old “losing your head” saying in reverse; taking enough damage will leave you with nothing but your noggin to role around. This is where that slight feeling of Namco Bandai’s beloved roll-em-up comes into play, as Bryce can retrieve his body parts and rebuilt himself by rolling over the pieces to collect them back up.

(At one part, while I watched, my office mate Ray ended up getting back to his arms first—which produced a rather funny situation as this head continued to roll around on the ground with two waving arms attached to it.)

How the full game ends up turning out has yet to be seen, but you’ve got to at least give it to the folks at Konami (and developer Rebellion Developments) for having a little fun with the third-person action genre.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS


About Eric Patterson

view all posts

Eric got his start via self-publishing game-related fanzines in junior high, and now has one goal in life: making sure EGM has as much coverage of niche Japanese games as he can convince them to fit in. Eric’s also active in the gaming community on a personal level, being an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming and consumer rights.

New Screens, Art, Thoughts on Konami’s NeverDead

NeverDead is like Katamari Damacy, except instead of rolling up candy or kittens or chairs, you're rolling up pieces of your dismembered body.

By Eric Patterson | 01/24/2012 05:03 PM PT

News

NeverDead is like Katamari Damacy, except instead of rolling up candy or kittens or chairs, you’re rolling up pieces of your dismembered body.

Okay, maybe the game isn’t exactly like that—but it’s hard not to think that thought at first. I got the chance to watch a bit of the game yesterday at it was played at the EGM offices, and it’s hard to not at least get a kick out of the concept.

The game’s protagonist Bryce Boltzmann—you’ve gotta love video game protagonist names—was cursed with immortality by the demon king Astaroth, and now finds himself living out his life as a bounty hunter/gun for hire of sorts.

Bryce’s immortality is what gives the game its most unique aspect. As you’re taking hits from enemy fire or melee attacks, receive enough damage and your limbs will be knocked off one-by-one. It’s the old “losing your head” saying in reverse; taking enough damage will leave you with nothing but your noggin to role around. This is where that slight feeling of Namco Bandai’s beloved roll-em-up comes into play, as Bryce can retrieve his body parts and rebuilt himself by rolling over the pieces to collect them back up.

(At one part, while I watched, my office mate Ray ended up getting back to his arms first—which produced a rather funny situation as this head continued to roll around on the ground with two waving arms attached to it.)

How the full game ends up turning out has yet to be seen, but you’ve got to at least give it to the folks at Konami (and developer Rebellion Developments) for having a little fun with the third-person action genre.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Eric Patterson

view all posts

Eric got his start via self-publishing game-related fanzines in junior high, and now has one goal in life: making sure EGM has as much coverage of niche Japanese games as he can convince them to fit in. Eric’s also active in the gaming community on a personal level, being an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming and consumer rights.