X
X
Nintendo Switch


 

Nintendo is redesigning the inside of the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Con controllers.

Ever since the Switch’s launch, a small number of users—statistically insignificant, by Nintendo’s statement at the time—reported having some connectivity issues with the left Joy-Con controller on their consoles. Nintendo investigated the issue, and eventually discovered that the placement of an antennae within the left Joy-Con was at fault.

While reports of connectivity issues remained rare, it seems that Nintendo is taking steps to fix the potential problem anyway. A new filing with the Federal Communications Commission reveals Nintendo’s request to modify the design of the left Joy-Con slightly, changing the “antenna pattern and peripheral circuit.” Photos included with the filing show what the innards of the new Joy-Con would look like.

At the moment, Nintendo hasn’t stated anything about how or when these new Joy-Cons will be rolling out. To be clear, this upgrade won’t change the look or functionality of the Joy-Con, simply fix the antennae, so it’s possible that the new design will be slowly phased in and used to replace Joy-Cons that aren’t working properly instead of being launched with a lot of fanfare.

At the moment, the number of players reporting issues is still “not [statistically] significant,” according to Nintendo, so most users will never see a problem. If you do start having problems with your Switch, though, it’s good to know that a fix is on the way.

Read More

Source: Federal Communications Commission


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Nintendo is redesigning the guts of the Switch’s left Joy-Con Controller

It won't look any different, but the left Joy-Con controller is getting a rework.

By Emma Schaefer | 05/1/2018 12:00 PM PT

News

Nintendo is redesigning the inside of the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Con controllers.

Ever since the Switch’s launch, a small number of users—statistically insignificant, by Nintendo’s statement at the time—reported having some connectivity issues with the left Joy-Con controller on their consoles. Nintendo investigated the issue, and eventually discovered that the placement of an antennae within the left Joy-Con was at fault.

While reports of connectivity issues remained rare, it seems that Nintendo is taking steps to fix the potential problem anyway. A new filing with the Federal Communications Commission reveals Nintendo’s request to modify the design of the left Joy-Con slightly, changing the “antenna pattern and peripheral circuit.” Photos included with the filing show what the innards of the new Joy-Con would look like.

At the moment, Nintendo hasn’t stated anything about how or when these new Joy-Cons will be rolling out. To be clear, this upgrade won’t change the look or functionality of the Joy-Con, simply fix the antennae, so it’s possible that the new design will be slowly phased in and used to replace Joy-Cons that aren’t working properly instead of being launched with a lot of fanfare.

At the moment, the number of players reporting issues is still “not [statistically] significant,” according to Nintendo, so most users will never see a problem. If you do start having problems with your Switch, though, it’s good to know that a fix is on the way.

Read More

Source: Federal Communications Commission



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM