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The Legend of Zelda


 

A few videos of an exploit in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild have been making the rounds lately. By abusing Magnesis, fans have been able to create infinite flying machines. Now, though, Nintendo has revealed that it knew about the exploit before launch—and deliberately left it in.

“One thing we saw at E3 [2016] was one of the NOA demonstrating staff, just in their downtime, figured out a way to use Magnesis to make themselves fly in a way,” art director Satoru Takizawa said in a recent interview with GameSpot. “And we’re like, ‘Okay, we hadn’t thought of that.” We all had to go back and try it ourselves.'”

The trick involves laying two specific metal pieces on top of each other in just the right position. Link can’t lift a platform that he is standing on directly, but with some very careful maneuvering, it’s possible to stack two metal pieces and lift the one on the bottom—therefore pushing both Link and the top metal piece into the air.

Another interesting tidbit dropped in the interview is of a feature Nintendo originally tested, and then removed.

“Until about halfway through the development, we had a spec where you could take your weapon and stab it into a wall,” Takizawa explained. “When your stamina gauge was dwindling you could stab the weapon and kind of hang out and rest there.”

The feature was removed because it was too unrealistic and, strangely, limiting rather than freeing.

“Mr. Miyamoto heard of the concept [and] said, ‘you can’t stand on the tip of a sword. This is strange,'” said Breath of the Wild director Hidemaro Fujibayashi. “And then we explained, ‘no no no, you stab it in.’ Then he’s like, ‘No, it’s not going to work.’ Another idea is that it’s very hard to actually stab a sword into a big piece of rock. We considered that you can stab them into cracks or crevices in the wall, but then you can’t freely use that feature anywhere you want, so I decided not to implement it.”

All of Nintendo’s work on Breath of the Wild has paid off, since the game has been breaking Nintendo sales records since its release. According to another recent statement by Nintendo, it’ll set the standard for future Zelda games to come.

Source: GameSpot

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About Emma Schaefer

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Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Nintendo left physics exploits in Breath of the Wild on purpose

Breath of the Wild's emphasis on player freedom apparently extends all the way to breaking the laws of physics.

By Emma Schaefer | 04/5/2017 01:30 PM PT

News

A few videos of an exploit in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild have been making the rounds lately. By abusing Magnesis, fans have been able to create infinite flying machines. Now, though, Nintendo has revealed that it knew about the exploit before launch—and deliberately left it in.

“One thing we saw at E3 [2016] was one of the NOA demonstrating staff, just in their downtime, figured out a way to use Magnesis to make themselves fly in a way,” art director Satoru Takizawa said in a recent interview with GameSpot. “And we’re like, ‘Okay, we hadn’t thought of that.” We all had to go back and try it ourselves.'”

The trick involves laying two specific metal pieces on top of each other in just the right position. Link can’t lift a platform that he is standing on directly, but with some very careful maneuvering, it’s possible to stack two metal pieces and lift the one on the bottom—therefore pushing both Link and the top metal piece into the air.

Another interesting tidbit dropped in the interview is of a feature Nintendo originally tested, and then removed.

“Until about halfway through the development, we had a spec where you could take your weapon and stab it into a wall,” Takizawa explained. “When your stamina gauge was dwindling you could stab the weapon and kind of hang out and rest there.”

The feature was removed because it was too unrealistic and, strangely, limiting rather than freeing.

“Mr. Miyamoto heard of the concept [and] said, ‘you can’t stand on the tip of a sword. This is strange,'” said Breath of the Wild director Hidemaro Fujibayashi. “And then we explained, ‘no no no, you stab it in.’ Then he’s like, ‘No, it’s not going to work.’ Another idea is that it’s very hard to actually stab a sword into a big piece of rock. We considered that you can stab them into cracks or crevices in the wall, but then you can’t freely use that feature anywhere you want, so I decided not to implement it.”

All of Nintendo’s work on Breath of the Wild has paid off, since the game has been breaking Nintendo sales records since its release. According to another recent statement by Nintendo, it’ll set the standard for future Zelda games to come.

Source: GameSpot

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About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM