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Octopath Traveler released today as a Nintendo Switch exclusive, but the game’s creators say their next projects may not be limited to the Switch.

Speaking to Eurogamer, producer Masashi Takahashi revealed why the team chose to work with the Switch, and how some of his future projects might branch out.

“There’s two reasons for Switch,” Takahashi said in an interview. “We already had experience with Nintendo with Bravely Default, and we’d decided to have Octopath as a worldwide experience. When we had to search for a partner for that, we had real confidence in Nintendo for that. And it’s an RPG – that means you have to play for a long time, and because our target audience was adults—like us—it’s hard for us to be seated on the sofa for so long. Our lifestyle, you want to play in bed before you sleep for an hour.”

However, even when the team knew the Switch would be their next platform, they had some struggles to face.

“When we started to make Octopath Traveler, the Switch wasn’t ready!” Takahashi said. “It was just a prototype—we didn’t know that much about the hardware. We just started because we wanted to make an RPG for a handheld system, but we didn’t really know what hardware it was going to be. No one could imagine the Switch becoming such a phenomenon.”

However, despite launching both the Bravely Default games and Octopath Traveler on Nintendo systems, the team behind all those games plans to branch out a little more.

“Because [Bravely Default] did well and sold well we became a special division,” Takahashi said. “Yes, we worked on Octopath Traveler and we’re working on Switch titles, but that doesn’t mean we’re only working on Switch titles.”

According to Takahashi, the team’s focus from here on out will be to make “new” properties. Though there’s potential for an Octopath sequel if the game is well-received, the team won’t return to working on Final Fantasy or any other older IPs.

Octopath Traveler is out now, exclusively on the Nintendo Switch.

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About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Octopath Traveler team working on more than just Switch games

We might get a future Bravely Default or Octopath Traveler on non-Nintendo systems.

By Emma Schaefer | 07/13/2018 04:30 PM PT | Updated 10/8/2018 11:42 AM PT

News

Octopath Traveler released today as a Nintendo Switch exclusive, but the game’s creators say their next projects may not be limited to the Switch.

Speaking to Eurogamer, producer Masashi Takahashi revealed why the team chose to work with the Switch, and how some of his future projects might branch out.

“There’s two reasons for Switch,” Takahashi said in an interview. “We already had experience with Nintendo with Bravely Default, and we’d decided to have Octopath as a worldwide experience. When we had to search for a partner for that, we had real confidence in Nintendo for that. And it’s an RPG – that means you have to play for a long time, and because our target audience was adults—like us—it’s hard for us to be seated on the sofa for so long. Our lifestyle, you want to play in bed before you sleep for an hour.”

However, even when the team knew the Switch would be their next platform, they had some struggles to face.

“When we started to make Octopath Traveler, the Switch wasn’t ready!” Takahashi said. “It was just a prototype—we didn’t know that much about the hardware. We just started because we wanted to make an RPG for a handheld system, but we didn’t really know what hardware it was going to be. No one could imagine the Switch becoming such a phenomenon.”

However, despite launching both the Bravely Default games and Octopath Traveler on Nintendo systems, the team behind all those games plans to branch out a little more.

“Because [Bravely Default] did well and sold well we became a special division,” Takahashi said. “Yes, we worked on Octopath Traveler and we’re working on Switch titles, but that doesn’t mean we’re only working on Switch titles.”

According to Takahashi, the team’s focus from here on out will be to make “new” properties. Though there’s potential for an Octopath sequel if the game is well-received, the team won’t return to working on Final Fantasy or any other older IPs.

Octopath Traveler is out now, exclusively on the Nintendo Switch.

Read More


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM