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THE BUZZ: With the modded Battlefield 3 servers that are floating around out there, it can be awfully tempting to want to try out the chaos of 128-player combat, or servers that offer up nothing but tanks.

EA and DICE, however, might want to have a word with you before you do. Not only has DICE said that playing on a modded server could get you banned from Battlefield 3, but EA games in general.

“Please avoid temptation and remain on these official servers while we work to have these servers dealt with,” a DICE representative said on the official Battlefield 3 forums. “Playing on those servers can cause your account to become compromised, stats to be altered or other issues to arise which may lead to having your account banned by EA.”

Then, and additional posting was made:

“If your account gets banned it does mean any EA game you have on your account would also be unavailable.”

EGM’s TAKE: I can understand DICE wanting to be very careful about how Battlefield 3 is presented before the game’s release, and wanting to protect the game from getting hacked in negative ways.

However, let’s be fair—modding has been a huge part of the PC gaming community for as long as there have been PC games. Telling players not to try modding games is like trying to tell fighting game fans not to find infinite combos. Doing something like hacking a map to allow for 128 players is a natural part of PC gaming, and I’d be worried if people weren’t trying to do it.

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About Eric Patterson

view all posts

Eric got his start via self-publishing game-related fanzines in junior high, and now has one goal in life: making sure EGM has as much coverage of niche Japanese games as he can convince them to fit in. Eric’s also active in the gaming community on a personal level, being an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming and consumer rights.

Play on modded Battlefield 3 server, get banned from Origin

With the modded Battlefield 3 servers that are floating around out there, it can be awfully tempting to want to try out the chaos of 128-player combat, or servers that offer up nothing but tanks.

By Eric Patterson | 10/3/2011 08:48 PM PT

News

THE BUZZ: With the modded Battlefield 3 servers that are floating around out there, it can be awfully tempting to want to try out the chaos of 128-player combat, or servers that offer up nothing but tanks.

EA and DICE, however, might want to have a word with you before you do. Not only has DICE said that playing on a modded server could get you banned from Battlefield 3, but EA games in general.

“Please avoid temptation and remain on these official servers while we work to have these servers dealt with,” a DICE representative said on the official Battlefield 3 forums. “Playing on those servers can cause your account to become compromised, stats to be altered or other issues to arise which may lead to having your account banned by EA.”

Then, and additional posting was made:

“If your account gets banned it does mean any EA game you have on your account would also be unavailable.”

EGM’s TAKE: I can understand DICE wanting to be very careful about how Battlefield 3 is presented before the game’s release, and wanting to protect the game from getting hacked in negative ways.

However, let’s be fair—modding has been a huge part of the PC gaming community for as long as there have been PC games. Telling players not to try modding games is like trying to tell fighting game fans not to find infinite combos. Doing something like hacking a map to allow for 128 players is a natural part of PC gaming, and I’d be worried if people weren’t trying to do it.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Eric Patterson

view all posts

Eric got his start via self-publishing game-related fanzines in junior high, and now has one goal in life: making sure EGM has as much coverage of niche Japanese games as he can convince them to fit in. Eric’s also active in the gaming community on a personal level, being an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming and consumer rights.