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In a special month of Pokémon coverage, Game Informer has unearthed several pieces of never-before-seen Pokémon history: the original design documents.

Junichi Masuda, the producer, director, and composer for the original Pokémon games, appears in the eight minute video, where he shows the world a brand new look at Pokémon’s early days.

“A lot of the original material we don’t have anymore, unfortunately,” Masuda said, while offering a look through some of his earliest notes. “But now, we’re trying to be more careful about digitally archiving everything. Especially back when we were developing Red, Ruby, Sapphire… we never thought we’d be showing this to people!”

The documents include everything from notes on the programming (including days that computers crashed and lost days of work) to storyboards for opening animations of the games.

Masuda also revealed some interesting tidbits about what drove the original designs of the games. For example, many of the first Pokémon in Pokémon Red and Green were created directly as pixel art, with no original drawing. This means that several of the series’ most iconic Pokémon only look the way they do because of the limits of the pixel art. Pokémon cries, too, were often reused and changed in length, since only around 40 sounds were supported.

Masuda began creating more detailed notes with later games in the series, and is able to trace connections and ideas that carried forward into the more current games. In Black and White, for example, the designers first had the idea for Pokémon in battle to look back at their trainers and make different expressions, but this idea didn’t make it into a game until the Pokémon Amie functionality appeared in X and Y.

It’s a fascinating look at the history of Pokémon, so be sure to check out the full video on Game Informer’s channel.

Read More

Source: Game Informer


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Pokémon creator reveals never-before-seen design docs

Junichi Masuda, the director and producer of the original Pokémon games, offers fans a behind-the-scenes look at the series' history.

By Emma Schaefer | 08/17/2017 03:30 PM PT | Updated 08/21/2017 10:44 PM PT

News

In a special month of Pokémon coverage, Game Informer has unearthed several pieces of never-before-seen Pokémon history: the original design documents.

Junichi Masuda, the producer, director, and composer for the original Pokémon games, appears in the eight minute video, where he shows the world a brand new look at Pokémon’s early days.

“A lot of the original material we don’t have anymore, unfortunately,” Masuda said, while offering a look through some of his earliest notes. “But now, we’re trying to be more careful about digitally archiving everything. Especially back when we were developing Red, Ruby, Sapphire… we never thought we’d be showing this to people!”

The documents include everything from notes on the programming (including days that computers crashed and lost days of work) to storyboards for opening animations of the games.

Masuda also revealed some interesting tidbits about what drove the original designs of the games. For example, many of the first Pokémon in Pokémon Red and Green were created directly as pixel art, with no original drawing. This means that several of the series’ most iconic Pokémon only look the way they do because of the limits of the pixel art. Pokémon cries, too, were often reused and changed in length, since only around 40 sounds were supported.

Masuda began creating more detailed notes with later games in the series, and is able to trace connections and ideas that carried forward into the more current games. In Black and White, for example, the designers first had the idea for Pokémon in battle to look back at their trainers and make different expressions, but this idea didn’t make it into a game until the Pokémon Amie functionality appeared in X and Y.

It’s a fascinating look at the history of Pokémon, so be sure to check out the full video on Game Informer’s channel.

Read More

Source: Game Informer



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM