X

REGISTER TO CUSTOMIZE
YOUR NEWS AND GET ALERTS
ON your favorite games

Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions
No thanks, take me to EGMNOW
X
Customize your news
for instant alerts on
your favorite games
Register below
(it only takes seconds)
Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions


X
X


 

Information is making its way around the Internet stating that a series of button and text commands can enable the Xbox One to be backward compatible with Xbox 360 games. It won’t do that—but it could brick your system.

First, here’s the image that gives the supposed instructions, courtesy of Delusibeta over on NeoGAF:

The problem is, there’s no such thing as enabling Xbox 360 backward compatibility on the Xbox One. If you don’t believe me, here’s familiar Xbox face Larry Hryb saying the same thing:

So what’s going on here?

When Microsoft designed the Xbox One, they decided to make it so that any retail console could be converted into a development kit for those who Microsoft feels should have access to such things. It’s a good idea, as it provides an easy, low-cost means of getting development consoles into the hands of those who want to make games for the platform.

The initial set of buttons—LB, RB, LT, RT—is no doubt a way to access a part of the system that allows for getting to the proper development tools (with Microsoft’s blessing). If you don’t know what you’re doing, however, playing around in that part of the Xbox One’s OS could end up causing some real problems.

Which, it’s said, is what will happen if you follow those instructions above, as doing so will supposedly put your console into a cycle of endless reboots that will essentially brick it.

Now, to be clear: we here at EGM haven’t been able to test this series of commands out. First, we have special debug consoles that don’t work the same as the standard retail units. Second, well, look: we’re a little scared to try it for ourselves without having a console we’re okay with not being usable for whatever period of time it’d take to get fixed.

No matter our ability to fully check the results of the steps being passed around or not, there’s no questioning this piece of advice: if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If there were actually a means of unlocking backward compatibility on the Xbox One, either Microsoft would have mentioned it by now, or it would be a feature not meant to be used—probably for good reason—until they did announce it. When you see instructions that tell you to put in strange commands into any piece of technology—game consoles, computers, smart phones, or whatever else—you should never do so unless you know exactly what you’re doing and what’s going to happen.

So, no, you can’t play Xbox 360 games on your Xbox One by doing a series of random things. Please, for the sake of your console and your sanity, don’t try this one at home boys and girls.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS


About Mollie L Patterson

view all posts

Mollie got her start in games media via the crazy world of gaming fanzines, and now works at EGM with the goal of covering all of the weird Japanese and niche releases that nobody else on staff cares about. She’s active in the gaming community on a personal level, and an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming, consumer rights, and good UI. Find her on Twitter @mollipen.

Do NOT Attempt to Make Your Xbox One Backward Compatible Via Internet Advice

By Mollie L Patterson | 12/6/2013 04:24 PM PT

News

Information is making its way around the Internet stating that a series of button and text commands can enable the Xbox One to be backward compatible with Xbox 360 games. It won’t do that—but it could brick your system.

First, here’s the image that gives the supposed instructions, courtesy of Delusibeta over on NeoGAF:

The problem is, there’s no such thing as enabling Xbox 360 backward compatibility on the Xbox One. If you don’t believe me, here’s familiar Xbox face Larry Hryb saying the same thing:

So what’s going on here?

When Microsoft designed the Xbox One, they decided to make it so that any retail console could be converted into a development kit for those who Microsoft feels should have access to such things. It’s a good idea, as it provides an easy, low-cost means of getting development consoles into the hands of those who want to make games for the platform.

The initial set of buttons—LB, RB, LT, RT—is no doubt a way to access a part of the system that allows for getting to the proper development tools (with Microsoft’s blessing). If you don’t know what you’re doing, however, playing around in that part of the Xbox One’s OS could end up causing some real problems.

Which, it’s said, is what will happen if you follow those instructions above, as doing so will supposedly put your console into a cycle of endless reboots that will essentially brick it.

Now, to be clear: we here at EGM haven’t been able to test this series of commands out. First, we have special debug consoles that don’t work the same as the standard retail units. Second, well, look: we’re a little scared to try it for ourselves without having a console we’re okay with not being usable for whatever period of time it’d take to get fixed.

No matter our ability to fully check the results of the steps being passed around or not, there’s no questioning this piece of advice: if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If there were actually a means of unlocking backward compatibility on the Xbox One, either Microsoft would have mentioned it by now, or it would be a feature not meant to be used—probably for good reason—until they did announce it. When you see instructions that tell you to put in strange commands into any piece of technology—game consoles, computers, smart phones, or whatever else—you should never do so unless you know exactly what you’re doing and what’s going to happen.

So, no, you can’t play Xbox 360 games on your Xbox One by doing a series of random things. Please, for the sake of your console and your sanity, don’t try this one at home boys and girls.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Mollie L Patterson

view all posts

Mollie got her start in games media via the crazy world of gaming fanzines, and now works at EGM with the goal of covering all of the weird Japanese and niche releases that nobody else on staff cares about. She’s active in the gaming community on a personal level, and an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming, consumer rights, and good UI. Find her on Twitter @mollipen.