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Pokémon Go is about to head into a new chapter with the upcoming launch of Generation III, but a recent discovery in the game’s privacy policy has players worried.

The Silph Road noticed an update to Pokémon Go‘s privacy policy that raises some suspicions. In subsection D of the privacy notes, as seen below, Niantic details what can be accessed on an authorized player’s phone. Apart from the standard identifiers for an operating system and user settings Niantic uses, it seems they now can also obtain “information about other applications installed on your (or your authorized child’s) device.”

via The Silph Road

While the company does not go on to explain why it can see what apps a user has installed, many believe it relates to the abuse of third-party applications that can exploit the game. Since the launch of Pokémon Go, Niantic has had an issue with trainers using GPS-spoofing apps that can either manipulate where the player is or tell them of any nearby Pokémon within a certain radius. Both exploits are technically cheating, as the point of the game is to physically travel to new areas to discover what Pokémon are available. In turn, it’s likely Niantic isn’t snooping around users’ phones to sell personal information but instead is attempting to crack down on cheaters.

Still, it’s understandable for players to have concerns over the discreet privacy policy change. Most apps store sensitive information that should only be accessed with the user’s permission, and while Niantic probably isn’t looking to exploit its players, there are serious possibilities to consider. For example, hackers could gain access to a trainer’s phone through Niantic’s servers. Also, with the company’s strong focus on banning third-party apps, trainers could start seeing punishments over the use of harmless apps, like IV checkers.

Niantic seemed to want to introduce this new change quietly, but with as much traction as its getting in the community, we’ll likely hear a formal response soon. For now, players can get prepared for the launch of Generation III in December and catch the final Legendary Beast before it’s gone forever.

Pokémon Go is available for iOS and Android.

Source: Game Rant

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About Evan Slead

view all posts

Evan has been loving games since he could hold a controller. When not replaying Megaman X or Castlevania: Symphony of the Night for the 100th time, he also has been writing about entertainment, from horror movie reviews for Bloody Good Horror to TV recaps and general news for Entertainment Weekly, and now all things gaming. Say hello on Twitter at @EvanSlead.

Quiet changes to Pokémon Go’s privacy policy could be troubling

Niantic may just be trying to crack down on spoofers with the privacy update, but some players find it too intrusive.

By Evan Slead | 11/3/2017 03:30 PM PT

News

Pokémon Go is about to head into a new chapter with the upcoming launch of Generation III, but a recent discovery in the game’s privacy policy has players worried.

The Silph Road noticed an update to Pokémon Go‘s privacy policy that raises some suspicions. In subsection D of the privacy notes, as seen below, Niantic details what can be accessed on an authorized player’s phone. Apart from the standard identifiers for an operating system and user settings Niantic uses, it seems they now can also obtain “information about other applications installed on your (or your authorized child’s) device.”

via The Silph Road

While the company does not go on to explain why it can see what apps a user has installed, many believe it relates to the abuse of third-party applications that can exploit the game. Since the launch of Pokémon Go, Niantic has had an issue with trainers using GPS-spoofing apps that can either manipulate where the player is or tell them of any nearby Pokémon within a certain radius. Both exploits are technically cheating, as the point of the game is to physically travel to new areas to discover what Pokémon are available. In turn, it’s likely Niantic isn’t snooping around users’ phones to sell personal information but instead is attempting to crack down on cheaters.

Still, it’s understandable for players to have concerns over the discreet privacy policy change. Most apps store sensitive information that should only be accessed with the user’s permission, and while Niantic probably isn’t looking to exploit its players, there are serious possibilities to consider. For example, hackers could gain access to a trainer’s phone through Niantic’s servers. Also, with the company’s strong focus on banning third-party apps, trainers could start seeing punishments over the use of harmless apps, like IV checkers.

Niantic seemed to want to introduce this new change quietly, but with as much traction as its getting in the community, we’ll likely hear a formal response soon. For now, players can get prepared for the launch of Generation III in December and catch the final Legendary Beast before it’s gone forever.

Pokémon Go is available for iOS and Android.

Source: Game Rant

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Evan Slead

view all posts

Evan has been loving games since he could hold a controller. When not replaying Megaman X or Castlevania: Symphony of the Night for the 100th time, he also has been writing about entertainment, from horror movie reviews for Bloody Good Horror to TV recaps and general news for Entertainment Weekly, and now all things gaming. Say hello on Twitter at @EvanSlead.