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Red Dead Redemption


 

One of the main reasons that Red Dead Redemption was such a huge hit, at least in my mind, is that it let players act out their own versions of Spaghetti Westerns. Not only was the world John Marston inhabited amazing and the story epic and gripping, shootouts on and off horseback felt tense and cinematic, especially in how enemies fell and doubled over.

It sounds like developer Rockstar is taking these cinematic shootouts to the next level with Red Dead Redemption 2. According to a recent interview with Spanish outlet HobbyConsolasRed Dead Redemption 2 will feature dynamic slow-motion deaths, even outside of missions.

These slow-mo deaths can occur during missions, but they can also occur in open-world free-roaming phases during gunfights with law enforcement agents or other bands of outlaws, Rockstar North co-director Rob Nelson revealed.

“[Slow-motion deaths] are dynamic and procedural,” Nelson said in a translation of the interview. “They are intelligent and they frame the action based on what you do.”

Nelson added that including these cinematic, slow-motion deaths outside of mission gameplay helps create “the consistency of the experience, whether you are in a mission or not. You still feel that you are playing the game, with the same character and seeing the same things: it is the same visual and mechanical language.”

The weapons themselves also sound like they will be more dynamic, interesting, and realistic than in the first game, but almost to a fault, according to Nelson.

“Balancing realism and fun is always our challenge,” he said. “You want to have a difference between these weapons, so that you feel that you like one more than the other. And if you squeeze the trigger in the middle of the reload we allow you to shoot twice and reload, so you can continue. If you wait, in a revolver, you can empty the six shots at once. It’s about that kind of thing. We have gone as deep as we could.”

The interview also revealed further details about what we can expect from Red Dead Redemption 2‘s open world. While we knew that AI would adhere to a realistic schedule, especially within the central bandit camp, Nelson also revealed how the persistence of your actions will play out in the world.

While in the country, your actions could have significant long-term effects. For example, killing a person and leaving them in the middle of nowhere will eventually attract vultures or coyotes to their corpse. However, performing similar actions in highly populated towns will result in shorter-term effects. Similarly, Nelson hinted that certain parts of the map will evolve and change over time, including the construction of a ranch that appears during the game going from a simple foundation to fully built.

The world also sounds more tactile and interactive than before. According to Nelson, specific attention was paid to how main character Arthur Morgan approaches different environments and obstacles, including “the way Arthur Morgan climbs or slides on embankments or how he adjusts the position of his body when it crosses vegetation.” Likewise, Nelson stated that interior environments will also be “more sophisticated… with things that you can open and explore, like drawers.” While many games include drawers you can open, this is something that’s been fairly lacking in Rockstar-developed open-world games.

Red Dead Redemption 2 is the most immersive open-world game they’ve created thus far.

Red Dead Redemption 2 will launch for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on October 26th. Meanwhile, you can ogle recently revealed screenshots.

Source: Wccftech

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About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Red Dead Redemption 2 has dynamic slow-mo deaths and deeper gunplay

Red Dead Redemption 2 takes another step towards being a living, breathing Spaghetti Western.

By Michael Goroff | 05/8/2018 02:30 PM PT

News

One of the main reasons that Red Dead Redemption was such a huge hit, at least in my mind, is that it let players act out their own versions of Spaghetti Westerns. Not only was the world John Marston inhabited amazing and the story epic and gripping, shootouts on and off horseback felt tense and cinematic, especially in how enemies fell and doubled over.

It sounds like developer Rockstar is taking these cinematic shootouts to the next level with Red Dead Redemption 2. According to a recent interview with Spanish outlet HobbyConsolasRed Dead Redemption 2 will feature dynamic slow-motion deaths, even outside of missions.

These slow-mo deaths can occur during missions, but they can also occur in open-world free-roaming phases during gunfights with law enforcement agents or other bands of outlaws, Rockstar North co-director Rob Nelson revealed.

“[Slow-motion deaths] are dynamic and procedural,” Nelson said in a translation of the interview. “They are intelligent and they frame the action based on what you do.”

Nelson added that including these cinematic, slow-motion deaths outside of mission gameplay helps create “the consistency of the experience, whether you are in a mission or not. You still feel that you are playing the game, with the same character and seeing the same things: it is the same visual and mechanical language.”

The weapons themselves also sound like they will be more dynamic, interesting, and realistic than in the first game, but almost to a fault, according to Nelson.

“Balancing realism and fun is always our challenge,” he said. “You want to have a difference between these weapons, so that you feel that you like one more than the other. And if you squeeze the trigger in the middle of the reload we allow you to shoot twice and reload, so you can continue. If you wait, in a revolver, you can empty the six shots at once. It’s about that kind of thing. We have gone as deep as we could.”

The interview also revealed further details about what we can expect from Red Dead Redemption 2‘s open world. While we knew that AI would adhere to a realistic schedule, especially within the central bandit camp, Nelson also revealed how the persistence of your actions will play out in the world.

While in the country, your actions could have significant long-term effects. For example, killing a person and leaving them in the middle of nowhere will eventually attract vultures or coyotes to their corpse. However, performing similar actions in highly populated towns will result in shorter-term effects. Similarly, Nelson hinted that certain parts of the map will evolve and change over time, including the construction of a ranch that appears during the game going from a simple foundation to fully built.

The world also sounds more tactile and interactive than before. According to Nelson, specific attention was paid to how main character Arthur Morgan approaches different environments and obstacles, including “the way Arthur Morgan climbs or slides on embankments or how he adjusts the position of his body when it crosses vegetation.” Likewise, Nelson stated that interior environments will also be “more sophisticated… with things that you can open and explore, like drawers.” While many games include drawers you can open, this is something that’s been fairly lacking in Rockstar-developed open-world games.

Red Dead Redemption 2 is the most immersive open-world game they’ve created thus far.

Red Dead Redemption 2 will launch for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on October 26th. Meanwhile, you can ogle recently revealed screenshots.

Source: Wccftech

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.