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Destiny


 

When you’ve played a still secretive upcoming game that isn’t supposed to be talked about in public, the best thing to do is write a blog post about that game. Or, wait… NOT write a blog post, I mean.

This tale starts with DemonWare, a division of Activision that “specializes in online software and services for videogames” (according to their website). It seems, a few months ago, a few representatives from DemonWare flew up to the Bungie Days event to get a look at Destiny. If you’ve forgotten, Destiny is the major new franchise that Bungie is developing post-Halo in conjunction with Activision.

The problem? One of those senior Demonware employees wrote a blog post about the trip and what they saw, and it got posted publicly on DemonWare’s blog. The post was of course pulled down, but a cached version of the post was still available on Google for a short time after that. Given that the opening line of that blog post talks about the secrecy of its details and how “if you cannot find it on Google you should not talk about it to non DemonWare employees”, the situation is more than a little ironic.

Superannuation over on Kotaku uncovered the cached page, which gives us details such as the following:

  • A video was shown that gave “a live scene walk through demonstrating lots of atmospherics, huge amounts of trees and foliage (SpeedTree), particle effects, dynamic lighting and dynamics time of day ending in a sun set”.
  • Paul McCartney is working on music for the game.
  • Destiny is “not a dedicated server game, but there is some simulation and coordination running in their server infrastructure.”
  • Those participation in the play session played in groups of three, giving hint to the game’s multiplayer. The DemonWare employee noted that “we did manage to experience entering a zone to find other players already taking on the bad guys” and that “it’s cooperative so we helped out (mostly [name redacted], I just died) before both groups went their separate ways”.
  • The game client was “remarkably stable and robust” even with servers constantly disappearing and reappearing.
  • The DemonWare employee noted that, for them, what they played of Destiny “brought back a sense of exploration I recall from playing Elite many years ago”.
  • The employee also commented that “I’m not fully sold on the appeal of being able to change the color of a weapon, but I guess it works in China, and customization and individual identity is a big theme for the game”.
  • And then, this interesting final thought: “It’s still quite like Halo, there is a lot of work still to be done.”

Source: Kotaku

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About Mollie L Patterson

view all posts

Mollie got her start in games media via the crazy world of gaming fanzines, and now works at EGM with the goal of covering all of the weird Japanese and niche releases that nobody else on staff cares about. She’s active in the gaming community on a personal level, and an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming, consumer rights, and good UI. Find her on Twitter @mollipen.

RUMOR: New Details On Bungie’s Destiny Series Leaked By DemonWare

When you've played a still secretive upcoming game that isn't supposed to be talked about in public, the best thing to do is write a blog post about that game. Or, wait... NOT write a blog post, I mean.

By Mollie L Patterson | 11/6/2012 05:49 PM PT

News

When you’ve played a still secretive upcoming game that isn’t supposed to be talked about in public, the best thing to do is write a blog post about that game. Or, wait… NOT write a blog post, I mean.

This tale starts with DemonWare, a division of Activision that “specializes in online software and services for videogames” (according to their website). It seems, a few months ago, a few representatives from DemonWare flew up to the Bungie Days event to get a look at Destiny. If you’ve forgotten, Destiny is the major new franchise that Bungie is developing post-Halo in conjunction with Activision.

The problem? One of those senior Demonware employees wrote a blog post about the trip and what they saw, and it got posted publicly on DemonWare’s blog. The post was of course pulled down, but a cached version of the post was still available on Google for a short time after that. Given that the opening line of that blog post talks about the secrecy of its details and how “if you cannot find it on Google you should not talk about it to non DemonWare employees”, the situation is more than a little ironic.

Superannuation over on Kotaku uncovered the cached page, which gives us details such as the following:

  • A video was shown that gave “a live scene walk through demonstrating lots of atmospherics, huge amounts of trees and foliage (SpeedTree), particle effects, dynamic lighting and dynamics time of day ending in a sun set”.
  • Paul McCartney is working on music for the game.
  • Destiny is “not a dedicated server game, but there is some simulation and coordination running in their server infrastructure.”
  • Those participation in the play session played in groups of three, giving hint to the game’s multiplayer. The DemonWare employee noted that “we did manage to experience entering a zone to find other players already taking on the bad guys” and that “it’s cooperative so we helped out (mostly [name redacted], I just died) before both groups went their separate ways”.
  • The game client was “remarkably stable and robust” even with servers constantly disappearing and reappearing.
  • The DemonWare employee noted that, for them, what they played of Destiny “brought back a sense of exploration I recall from playing Elite many years ago”.
  • The employee also commented that “I’m not fully sold on the appeal of being able to change the color of a weapon, but I guess it works in China, and customization and individual identity is a big theme for the game”.
  • And then, this interesting final thought: “It’s still quite like Halo, there is a lot of work still to be done.”

Source: Kotaku

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Mollie L Patterson

view all posts

Mollie got her start in games media via the crazy world of gaming fanzines, and now works at EGM with the goal of covering all of the weird Japanese and niche releases that nobody else on staff cares about. She’s active in the gaming community on a personal level, and an outspoken voice on topics such as equality in gaming, consumer rights, and good UI. Find her on Twitter @mollipen.