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Nintendo Switch


 

Nintendo Switch Online seems to be skipping out on a few of the crucial reasons fans want their game saves to be stored in the Cloud, according to the latest information from Nintendo’s own site.

Nintendo Switch Online, the first online paid service offered by Nintendo for the Nintendo Switch, is scheduled to go online later this month, but Nintendo still has yet to reveal a few important details about the service. One of the main benefits it offers is cloud saves, letting players store their data on Nintendo’s servers so that progress can be regained in the event of a console getting lost or broken. As Game Informer found by hunting through Nintendo’s site, though, some of Nintendo’s biggest upcoming games won’t support the feature and will leave players at risk of losing their progress forever.

When looking at Nintendo.com, a message on certain game pages warns players that “this game does not support Save Data Cloud backup.” Some of the games that bear this message include Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Eevee!, Splatoon 2, Dark Souls Remastered, Dead Cells, FIFA 19, and NBA 2K19.

A Nintendo representative responded to the discovery, confirming that this seemingly central feature would be missing from the above games.

“The vast majority of Nintendo Switch games will support Save Data Cloud backup,” the response reads. “However, in certain games this feature would make it possible to, for example, regain items that had been traded to other players, or revert to a higher online multiplayer ranking that had been lost. To ensure fair play, Save Data Cloud backup may not be enabled for such games.”

The response goes on to specifically call out Splatoon 2 as a game that won’t allow for cloud saves.

However, this response raises more question than it answers. Why are players’ online rankings stored as local data? Why doesn’t the game automatically save upon trading or interacting with another player, as many games do? It’s not as if barring cloud saves prevents this issue from happening, either—the original Splatoon featured a prominent exploit where players could use an external hard drive to reset randomly rolled gear and their rankings, something which was only possible precisely because the game’s saves were stored locally on a hard drive and not backed up to a server somewhere.

Nintendo still need to clarify a lot of details about Nintendo Switch Online, including the exact day that it’ll be coming out. Since it’s set to launch this month, however, we’re bound to hear more soon.

Read More

Source: GameInformer


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

Some of the Nintendo Switch’s biggest games won’t support cloud saves

If you lose or break your Nintendo Switch, some of your game data will be lost forever—even with Nintendo Switch Online.

By Emma Schaefer | 09/10/2018 12:30 PM PT

News

Nintendo Switch Online seems to be skipping out on a few of the crucial reasons fans want their game saves to be stored in the Cloud, according to the latest information from Nintendo’s own site.

Nintendo Switch Online, the first online paid service offered by Nintendo for the Nintendo Switch, is scheduled to go online later this month, but Nintendo still has yet to reveal a few important details about the service. One of the main benefits it offers is cloud saves, letting players store their data on Nintendo’s servers so that progress can be regained in the event of a console getting lost or broken. As Game Informer found by hunting through Nintendo’s site, though, some of Nintendo’s biggest upcoming games won’t support the feature and will leave players at risk of losing their progress forever.

When looking at Nintendo.com, a message on certain game pages warns players that “this game does not support Save Data Cloud backup.” Some of the games that bear this message include Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Eevee!, Splatoon 2, Dark Souls Remastered, Dead Cells, FIFA 19, and NBA 2K19.

A Nintendo representative responded to the discovery, confirming that this seemingly central feature would be missing from the above games.

“The vast majority of Nintendo Switch games will support Save Data Cloud backup,” the response reads. “However, in certain games this feature would make it possible to, for example, regain items that had been traded to other players, or revert to a higher online multiplayer ranking that had been lost. To ensure fair play, Save Data Cloud backup may not be enabled for such games.”

The response goes on to specifically call out Splatoon 2 as a game that won’t allow for cloud saves.

However, this response raises more question than it answers. Why are players’ online rankings stored as local data? Why doesn’t the game automatically save upon trading or interacting with another player, as many games do? It’s not as if barring cloud saves prevents this issue from happening, either—the original Splatoon featured a prominent exploit where players could use an external hard drive to reset randomly rolled gear and their rankings, something which was only possible precisely because the game’s saves were stored locally on a hard drive and not backed up to a server somewhere.

Nintendo still need to clarify a lot of details about Nintendo Switch Online, including the exact day that it’ll be coming out. Since it’s set to launch this month, however, we’re bound to hear more soon.

Read More

Source: GameInformer



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM