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Here’s the first installment of Crytek’s video series “The 7 Wonders of Crysis 3,” designed to introduce the game’s world while showing off the insanely gorgeous CryENGINE-powered graphics.

Cryis 3 marks the return of post-human warrior Prophet to New York City twenty-four years after the events of Crysis 2. Most of the trailer is seen through Prophet’s eyes, a simulacrum of gameplay, with the occasional cinematic moment thrown in. Though, honestly, those perspective breaks drive me up a wall. Never leaving Prophet’s perspective is part of what made the narrative integration in Crysis 2 so effective. I get that it’s a piece of marketing, but still—sell me on the game the way way.

Also, the closing dialogue is just awful. Makes me wish Richard K. Morgan (author of Altered Carbon, Thirteen, and the man responsible for penning Crysis 2) was still involved in the project. Hopefully, like the cinematic breaks, the dialogue just represents marketing script, and is in no way indicative of new script magician Steven Hall’s writing quality.

The 7 Wonders of Crysis 3: Episode 1 – Hell of a Town

Here's the first installment of Crytek's video series "The 7 Wonders of Crysis 3," designed to introduce the game's world while showing off the insanely gorgeous CryENGINE-powered graphics.

By | 12/15/2012 01:28 PM PT

News

Here’s the first installment of Crytek’s video series “The 7 Wonders of Crysis 3,” designed to introduce the game’s world while showing off the insanely gorgeous CryENGINE-powered graphics.

Cryis 3 marks the return of post-human warrior Prophet to New York City twenty-four years after the events of Crysis 2. Most of the trailer is seen through Prophet’s eyes, a simulacrum of gameplay, with the occasional cinematic moment thrown in. Though, honestly, those perspective breaks drive me up a wall. Never leaving Prophet’s perspective is part of what made the narrative integration in Crysis 2 so effective. I get that it’s a piece of marketing, but still—sell me on the game the way way.

Also, the closing dialogue is just awful. Makes me wish Richard K. Morgan (author of Altered Carbon, Thirteen, and the man responsible for penning Crysis 2) was still involved in the project. Hopefully, like the cinematic breaks, the dialogue just represents marketing script, and is in no way indicative of new script magician Steven Hall’s writing quality.

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