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Nearly three months after launch, the Nintendo Switch is still experiencing stock shortages. Nintendo’s already revealed plans to up production, but according to a new report, that may not prove to be an easy task, for one very big reason.

According to a recent story from The Wall Street Journal, an industry-wide shortage of components is affecting production of all devices that use LCD screens, flash-memory chips, and even the type of motors used in the Switch’s Joy-Con controllers.

Of course, the Nintendo Switch isn’t the only device to use such components. They’re also used in nearly every smartphone and tablet, which puts Nintendo in direct competition with major companies like Apple for parts. This means that component prices will likely soar as companies battle over the limited stock, and that’s not a fight Nintendo’s in a position to win.

Nintendo’s recent history, too, could discourage the company from pushing for a more ambitious production plan. The Wii U was over-stocked, with many units sitting on shelves instead of selling, and that’s surely not a situation Nintendo wants to repeat.

Despite this, other analysts from The Financial Times report that Nintendo would like to up production for the Switch in order to move 18 million units before the end of the fiscal year, with a particular emphasis on getting units in stock before the holiday season hits. Whether or not this goal is achievable, though, will likely be determined by the emerging components shortage.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

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About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

The company to blame for Nintendo Switch shortages might be… Apple?

The Nintendo Switch and iPhones use a lot of the same electronic components, and that could be a problem.

By Emma Schaefer | 05/31/2017 02:15 PM PT

News

Nearly three months after launch, the Nintendo Switch is still experiencing stock shortages. Nintendo’s already revealed plans to up production, but according to a new report, that may not prove to be an easy task, for one very big reason.

According to a recent story from The Wall Street Journal, an industry-wide shortage of components is affecting production of all devices that use LCD screens, flash-memory chips, and even the type of motors used in the Switch’s Joy-Con controllers.

Of course, the Nintendo Switch isn’t the only device to use such components. They’re also used in nearly every smartphone and tablet, which puts Nintendo in direct competition with major companies like Apple for parts. This means that component prices will likely soar as companies battle over the limited stock, and that’s not a fight Nintendo’s in a position to win.

Nintendo’s recent history, too, could discourage the company from pushing for a more ambitious production plan. The Wii U was over-stocked, with many units sitting on shelves instead of selling, and that’s surely not a situation Nintendo wants to repeat.

Despite this, other analysts from The Financial Times report that Nintendo would like to up production for the Switch in order to move 18 million units before the end of the fiscal year, with a particular emphasis on getting units in stock before the holiday season hits. Whether or not this goal is achievable, though, will likely be determined by the emerging components shortage.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM