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PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds


 

The inaugural PUBG Global Invitational kicked off in Berlin recently, and it’s kind of exciting if you like watching 20 teams compete for a slice of a $2 million prize pool. It’s apparently also exciting if you like extremely goofy, overly dramatic opening ceremonies.

If you missed it, you can watch a replay of the competition’s first day on the official PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds Twitch channel. The opening ceremony starts about 90 minutes into the video.

It’s kind of insane. First, it starts with dramatic piano music and lasers. Okay, so far pretty normal. And then it gets nuts.

Cue the uniformly attractive violinists on stage as the competing players walk up. Cue a crazy digital backdrop of players parachuting into a PUBG match. Cue dancers being lowered from the ceilings on cables to simulate said parachuting. Cue an curiously balletic interpretation of how a PUBG match plays out, complete with Eurotrash dance music.

Bluehole kicking off its biggest-ever esports event with a literal song-and-dance number was pretty genius, in that it did manage to get us talking about the PGI. Unfortunately, the entire event wasn’t accompanied by interpretative dancers reenacting the action on screen and was instead marked by normal PUBG tomfoolery like a grenade not killing a player even though it’s literally inches away from him.

No matter how big PUBG‘s esports scene might get, longtime fans should rest easy knowing that some things never change.

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is available on PC and Xbox One.

Source: PC Gamer

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About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

The PUBG Global Invitational’s opening ceremony was… something else

Bold move to open your esports event with a literal song-and-dance routine.

By Michael Goroff | 07/25/2018 03:30 PM PT

News

The inaugural PUBG Global Invitational kicked off in Berlin recently, and it’s kind of exciting if you like watching 20 teams compete for a slice of a $2 million prize pool. It’s apparently also exciting if you like extremely goofy, overly dramatic opening ceremonies.

If you missed it, you can watch a replay of the competition’s first day on the official PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds Twitch channel. The opening ceremony starts about 90 minutes into the video.

It’s kind of insane. First, it starts with dramatic piano music and lasers. Okay, so far pretty normal. And then it gets nuts.

Cue the uniformly attractive violinists on stage as the competing players walk up. Cue a crazy digital backdrop of players parachuting into a PUBG match. Cue dancers being lowered from the ceilings on cables to simulate said parachuting. Cue an curiously balletic interpretation of how a PUBG match plays out, complete with Eurotrash dance music.

Bluehole kicking off its biggest-ever esports event with a literal song-and-dance number was pretty genius, in that it did manage to get us talking about the PGI. Unfortunately, the entire event wasn’t accompanied by interpretative dancers reenacting the action on screen and was instead marked by normal PUBG tomfoolery like a grenade not killing a player even though it’s literally inches away from him.

No matter how big PUBG‘s esports scene might get, longtime fans should rest easy knowing that some things never change.

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is available on PC and Xbox One.

Source: PC Gamer

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About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.