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With fans eagerly awaiting the release of the SNES Classic Edition, a recent teardown of Nintendo’s new device shows a curious similarity to last year’s NES Classic Edition. For those that were able to get their hands on the mini NES and loved it, good news! The internals for the mini SNES are the same.

While the systems emulate different games from their respective console eras, their hardware specs are close to identical. Eurogamer recently took apart the upcoming SNES Classic Edition to find confirmation of its similarity to the mini NES and found the hunch to be correct. “Hardware-wise, we’re looking at the same off-the-shelf Allwinner R16 SoC (system on chip), featuring four ARM Cortex A7’s paired with an ARM Mali 400 MP2 GPU,” reported Eurogamer. “Hynix provides the single memory chip—a 256MB DDR3 module—and there’s a generous 512MB of NAND storage.”

The difference between the two devices comes down to the external look and the software running them. With the original SNES having better graphics than the NES, a new emulation software had to be installed to run the new library of games, including Star Fox II, Yoshi’s Island, and Kirby Super Star. The Super FX and FX2 chips help run these games and push them from their original 240p to 720p.

It’s likely Nintendo essentially recycled the hardware for the SNES Classic Edition so they could keep production smooth. The company confirmed NES Classic Editions would be returning to production in 2018, alongside the continued creation and sale of the mini SNES. Of course, this more streamlined tech also means hacking the new device will be just as easy as it was for the mini NES.

While it’s comforting to know Nintendo is attempting to avoid repeating the insanely limited supply of NES Classic Editions, pre-orders for the SNES Classic Edition sold out within hours. Many fans hoping to get one on the September 29th launch day will have to try hitting a store early in the morning.

Source: Eurogamer

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About Evan Slead

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Evan has been loving games since he could hold a controller. When not replaying Megaman X or Castlevania: Symphony of the Night for the 100th time, he also has been writing about entertainment, from horror movie reviews for Bloody Good Horror to TV recaps and general news for Entertainment Weekly, and now all things gaming. Say hello on Twitter at @EvanSlead.

The SNES Classic Edition isn’t a sequel to the NES mini—it’s a reskin

This teardown reveals a surprise inside the SNES Classic Edition, but it's actually good news.

By Evan Slead | 09/28/2017 03:30 PM PT

News

With fans eagerly awaiting the release of the SNES Classic Edition, a recent teardown of Nintendo’s new device shows a curious similarity to last year’s NES Classic Edition. For those that were able to get their hands on the mini NES and loved it, good news! The internals for the mini SNES are the same.

While the systems emulate different games from their respective console eras, their hardware specs are close to identical. Eurogamer recently took apart the upcoming SNES Classic Edition to find confirmation of its similarity to the mini NES and found the hunch to be correct. “Hardware-wise, we’re looking at the same off-the-shelf Allwinner R16 SoC (system on chip), featuring four ARM Cortex A7’s paired with an ARM Mali 400 MP2 GPU,” reported Eurogamer. “Hynix provides the single memory chip—a 256MB DDR3 module—and there’s a generous 512MB of NAND storage.”

The difference between the two devices comes down to the external look and the software running them. With the original SNES having better graphics than the NES, a new emulation software had to be installed to run the new library of games, including Star Fox II, Yoshi’s Island, and Kirby Super Star. The Super FX and FX2 chips help run these games and push them from their original 240p to 720p.

It’s likely Nintendo essentially recycled the hardware for the SNES Classic Edition so they could keep production smooth. The company confirmed NES Classic Editions would be returning to production in 2018, alongside the continued creation and sale of the mini SNES. Of course, this more streamlined tech also means hacking the new device will be just as easy as it was for the mini NES.

While it’s comforting to know Nintendo is attempting to avoid repeating the insanely limited supply of NES Classic Editions, pre-orders for the SNES Classic Edition sold out within hours. Many fans hoping to get one on the September 29th launch day will have to try hitting a store early in the morning.

Source: Eurogamer

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About Evan Slead

view all posts

Evan has been loving games since he could hold a controller. When not replaying Megaman X or Castlevania: Symphony of the Night for the 100th time, he also has been writing about entertainment, from horror movie reviews for Bloody Good Horror to TV recaps and general news for Entertainment Weekly, and now all things gaming. Say hello on Twitter at @EvanSlead.