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While rumors have been flying around the next console we might see from Sony, the common consensus has been that we’re still at least a year or two away from a PlayStation 5 release. Now, Eurogamer has dived into the tech behind the console in hopes of coming up with a more accurate picture of when we’ll see the PS5—and what it might look like.

According to Digital Foundry, the technological section of Eurogamer, there are two big technological steps that need to be taken before a “generational leap in console power” can be achieved: the availability of a smaller, denser main processor and more memory.

While more powerful processors than the one currently used by Sony exist, it’s more difficult to find ones that can be widely manufactured without raising the price of a console by a significant amount. Digital Foundry speculates that Sony will partner with AMD again for the processor, which integrates both CPU and GPU components into one chip and allows for smaller consoles. However, writer Richard Leadbetter points out that it may be possible to include two core complexes in a console, offering “desktop CPU-level performance.”

The second issue, memory, is harder to solve. Memory prices are increasing dramatically, and games require increasingly more of it. For what Leadbetter calls a “generational leap” to be attained, Sony may need to completely reinvent how storage capability, memory bandwidth, and overall capacity is handled.

Deep Foundry goes into a much deeper look at all of the technology behind the potential PlayStation 5, and the article is worth a read. The long and short of it, however, is that we likely won’t achieve the type of technological leap a new console generation demands before the end of 2019—and even then, prices may dictate that the release wait until even later.

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Source: Eurogamer


About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM

What the PlayStation 5 might look like from the inside

Digital Foundry offers compelling speculation about what technology might be gracing Sony's next console.

By Emma Schaefer | 04/18/2018 02:30 PM PT

News

While rumors have been flying around the next console we might see from Sony, the common consensus has been that we’re still at least a year or two away from a PlayStation 5 release. Now, Eurogamer has dived into the tech behind the console in hopes of coming up with a more accurate picture of when we’ll see the PS5—and what it might look like.

According to Digital Foundry, the technological section of Eurogamer, there are two big technological steps that need to be taken before a “generational leap in console power” can be achieved: the availability of a smaller, denser main processor and more memory.

While more powerful processors than the one currently used by Sony exist, it’s more difficult to find ones that can be widely manufactured without raising the price of a console by a significant amount. Digital Foundry speculates that Sony will partner with AMD again for the processor, which integrates both CPU and GPU components into one chip and allows for smaller consoles. However, writer Richard Leadbetter points out that it may be possible to include two core complexes in a console, offering “desktop CPU-level performance.”

The second issue, memory, is harder to solve. Memory prices are increasing dramatically, and games require increasingly more of it. For what Leadbetter calls a “generational leap” to be attained, Sony may need to completely reinvent how storage capability, memory bandwidth, and overall capacity is handled.

Deep Foundry goes into a much deeper look at all of the technology behind the potential PlayStation 5, and the article is worth a read. The long and short of it, however, is that we likely won’t achieve the type of technological leap a new console generation demands before the end of 2019—and even then, prices may dictate that the release wait until even later.

Read More

Source: Eurogamer



About Emma Schaefer

view all posts

Emma’s early gaming was mostly done in secret, as the only gamer in a family of normal people. She still retains skills from this dark period in her life, such as the ability to teleport instantly across the house away from the computer, and holds a gold medal in the Olympic sport of “Hide the Gameboy.” Sorry, Mom, now you know. Find her on Twitter @Emma4EGM