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Backward compatibility has become a hot-button issue as of late, thanks to a comment from a Sony executive defending the decision to not bring backward compatibility to PlayStation 4. Soon after, the controversial stance—that no one actually cares about the feature—was seemingly confirmed by a recent study claiming that backward compatibility is a way less popular than you’d think among Xbox One owners.

Now Xbox vice president Mike Ybarra is weighing in on the topic, and he’s none too happy about what people are saying.

Ybarra recently tweeted in response to Sony’s global sales chief Jim Ryan’s aforementioned comments, saying that Xbox wants “gamers to play the best games of the past, current, and future. It’s what gamers have asked for.”

When another Twitter user responded with the results of the previously mentioned study, Ybarra shot them down.

This was followed by a spate of tweets from the likes of Xbox chief marketing officer Mike Nichols and head of Xbox Phil Spencer defending the program with some statistics of their own.

These figures don’t necessarily contradict the study, but they do offer a different viewpoint. If Nichols’ figures are correct, since backward compatibility went live in November 2015, Xbox One users have played backward-compatible games close to 1 million hours each day.

While that may sound like a huge number, the original Ars Technica study used data which suggested that the average Xbox One owner used their consoles for an average of 25 hours during a five-month period, meaning only five hours each month, which seems like a suspiciously low figure to us.

This all boils down to a simple question: Do the benefits of backward compatibility, i.e. having more people buy your console, outweigh the costs of introducing such a program in the first place?

But maybe the real question is: If Xbox wants to continue to support backward compatibility, how is that a bad thing for gamers?

While Xbox continues to look toward the future with Project Scorpio’s imminent reveal, it’ll be interesting to see whether this topic of games from the past is brought up during Xbox’s upcoming E3 2017 press conference, and whether Sony has a response (other than its long list of exclusive titles, like the new Spider-Man game).

Source: GameRant

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About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

Xbox team rejects study claiming no one uses backward compatibility

Is Xbox One's backward compatibility popular and widely used after all?

By Michael Goroff | 06/8/2017 11:00 AM PT | Updated 06/8/2017 11:01 AM PT

News

Backward compatibility has become a hot-button issue as of late, thanks to a comment from a Sony executive defending the decision to not bring backward compatibility to PlayStation 4. Soon after, the controversial stance—that no one actually cares about the feature—was seemingly confirmed by a recent study claiming that backward compatibility is a way less popular than you’d think among Xbox One owners.

Now Xbox vice president Mike Ybarra is weighing in on the topic, and he’s none too happy about what people are saying.

Ybarra recently tweeted in response to Sony’s global sales chief Jim Ryan’s aforementioned comments, saying that Xbox wants “gamers to play the best games of the past, current, and future. It’s what gamers have asked for.”

When another Twitter user responded with the results of the previously mentioned study, Ybarra shot them down.

This was followed by a spate of tweets from the likes of Xbox chief marketing officer Mike Nichols and head of Xbox Phil Spencer defending the program with some statistics of their own.

These figures don’t necessarily contradict the study, but they do offer a different viewpoint. If Nichols’ figures are correct, since backward compatibility went live in November 2015, Xbox One users have played backward-compatible games close to 1 million hours each day.

While that may sound like a huge number, the original Ars Technica study used data which suggested that the average Xbox One owner used their consoles for an average of 25 hours during a five-month period, meaning only five hours each month, which seems like a suspiciously low figure to us.

This all boils down to a simple question: Do the benefits of backward compatibility, i.e. having more people buy your console, outweigh the costs of introducing such a program in the first place?

But maybe the real question is: If Xbox wants to continue to support backward compatibility, how is that a bad thing for gamers?

While Xbox continues to look toward the future with Project Scorpio’s imminent reveal, it’ll be interesting to see whether this topic of games from the past is brought up during Xbox’s upcoming E3 2017 press conference, and whether Sony has a response (other than its long list of exclusive titles, like the new Spider-Man game).

Source: GameRant

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.