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Fortnite


 

If you were still, for some reason, unclear about Fortnite becoming a money-printing machine for Epic Games, maybe this fat figure will finally convince you: $1 billion.

That’s how much money Fortnite‘s V-bucks have made for Epic Games, both in Battle Royale and Save the World modes (though, let’s be real, the bulk must be coming from Battle Royale). That $1 billion figure doesn’t even include the retail versions of Save the World that Epic’s sold. We’re just talking about V-bucks here.

This is according to a recent report from the analysts at Superdata (via GamesIndustry.biz) that also showed when, exactly, Fortnite‘s revenue spike: March 2018 saw the biggest single-month increase in revenue, followed closely by April. May was a slower month for growth, but the game still earned over $300 million, so that should say something. It’ll be interesting to see what kind of numbers come out in July following the launch of the game’s fifth season of content.

Thankfully, Epic isn’t just sitting on top of its piles of money or swimming in it like Scrooge McDuck. It recently announced that it’s putting $100 million into kicking off its esports initiatives, starting with an overall prize pool of $8 million for its Summer Skirmish series, even if the first Summer Skirmish event was a complete train wreck. Better than giving money to pro gamers, however, is Epic’s new Unreal Engine Marketplace about letting creators keep an even bigger cut of their sales than before, all thanks to the ridiculous amount of cash that Fortnite is banking.

Fortnite is available on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC, and mobile.

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About Michael Goroff

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Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.

You chumps spent $1 billion on Fortnite

We could have pooled all our money and bought a real island to fight on, but noooooooo.

By Michael Goroff | 07/19/2018 03:30 PM PT

News

If you were still, for some reason, unclear about Fortnite becoming a money-printing machine for Epic Games, maybe this fat figure will finally convince you: $1 billion.

That’s how much money Fortnite‘s V-bucks have made for Epic Games, both in Battle Royale and Save the World modes (though, let’s be real, the bulk must be coming from Battle Royale). That $1 billion figure doesn’t even include the retail versions of Save the World that Epic’s sold. We’re just talking about V-bucks here.

This is according to a recent report from the analysts at Superdata (via GamesIndustry.biz) that also showed when, exactly, Fortnite‘s revenue spike: March 2018 saw the biggest single-month increase in revenue, followed closely by April. May was a slower month for growth, but the game still earned over $300 million, so that should say something. It’ll be interesting to see what kind of numbers come out in July following the launch of the game’s fifth season of content.

Thankfully, Epic isn’t just sitting on top of its piles of money or swimming in it like Scrooge McDuck. It recently announced that it’s putting $100 million into kicking off its esports initiatives, starting with an overall prize pool of $8 million for its Summer Skirmish series, even if the first Summer Skirmish event was a complete train wreck. Better than giving money to pro gamers, however, is Epic’s new Unreal Engine Marketplace about letting creators keep an even bigger cut of their sales than before, all thanks to the ridiculous amount of cash that Fortnite is banking.

Fortnite is available on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC, and mobile.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Michael Goroff

view all posts

Michael Goroff has been gaming for almost three decades. He's a lover of all games and systems, but he mostly plays Xbox. That being said, if he's a fanboy, he's a fanboy for the game industry as a whole. Spit white-hot fanboy hate at him, trash talk his Gold II rank on Rocket League, or maybe just send him a cordial hello on Twitter @gogogoroff.