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Disney Infinity


E3 2013: Disney Infinity

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Publisher Disney Interactive Studios
Developer Avalanche Studios
Platform 360, PS3, Wii U, 3DS, Wii, PC
Release Date 08.18.2013
Not sure what any of this stuff means? Head on over to our E3 hub for all the deets.

The Rundown

Disney set out to create a game where beloved characters from their different franchises could come together and interact in much the same way that children play with their toys. This is a difficult proposition when dealing with disparate properties like classic Disney movies, Pixar characters and even live action films—and we aren’t even around to considering the Marvel and Star Wars universes yet!

But, if you have a game that uses toys in a similar way as Skylanders, and make a big digital Toy Box to put them in, then players can take them out and mix-and-match to their hearts content. Include some franchise specific play sets—with gameplay appropriate to that property, tons of unlockables, and a powerful design tools that let you make your own games—and you have more than a game, you have … well, a toy box.

The Verdict

While thought and creativity has been put into each of the five play sets—three of which come with the game, two you must purchase expansion sets to unlock—these 4-6 hour games aren’t where Disney Infinity’s appeal resides. Unfortunately, anyone who wants to unlock the hundreds of components for the Toy Box will have to play through them. While the gameplay here isn’t bad, it skews a little young and may not hold the interest of older gamers.

However, the trudge looks worthwhile once you get your hands on the Toy Box. This intuitive mode allows users to let their creativity flow freely, filling the world with themes, structures, items and creatures. Then you can assign behaviors to them, take advantage of the built-in physics, and come up with complex scenarios to make the game you want to play. You can save these and upload them to Disney who will check them for Disney appropriate content and make the best of them available to the Disney Infinity community.

There may be a slight disconnect between the Play Sets and Toy Box modes, as older kids and adults are likely to get more out of the design tools. Still, the game looks like it should be fun for all ages. We will know for sure when the game launches on August 18.

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About Marc Camron

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Marc somehow survived E3. The crowds were big, the games were loud and somehow he managed to get a sunburn on the top of his big, bald melon. Yet, despite all of this, he had a blast, seeing people he only sees once a year, playing all of the new games, and staying up way past his bedtime. Next year he might even have a beer. Find him on Twitter @RkyMtnGmr

E3 2013: Disney Infinity

By Marc Camron | 06/14/2013 03:00 AM PT

Previews

Publisher Disney Interactive Studios
Developer Avalanche Studios
Platform 360, PS3, Wii U, 3DS, Wii, PC
Release Date 08.18.2013
Not sure what any of this stuff means? Head on over to our E3 hub for all the deets.

The Rundown

Disney set out to create a game where beloved characters from their different franchises could come together and interact in much the same way that children play with their toys. This is a difficult proposition when dealing with disparate properties like classic Disney movies, Pixar characters and even live action films—and we aren’t even around to considering the Marvel and Star Wars universes yet!

But, if you have a game that uses toys in a similar way as Skylanders, and make a big digital Toy Box to put them in, then players can take them out and mix-and-match to their hearts content. Include some franchise specific play sets—with gameplay appropriate to that property, tons of unlockables, and a powerful design tools that let you make your own games—and you have more than a game, you have … well, a toy box.

The Verdict

While thought and creativity has been put into each of the five play sets—three of which come with the game, two you must purchase expansion sets to unlock—these 4-6 hour games aren’t where Disney Infinity’s appeal resides. Unfortunately, anyone who wants to unlock the hundreds of components for the Toy Box will have to play through them. While the gameplay here isn’t bad, it skews a little young and may not hold the interest of older gamers.

However, the trudge looks worthwhile once you get your hands on the Toy Box. This intuitive mode allows users to let their creativity flow freely, filling the world with themes, structures, items and creatures. Then you can assign behaviors to them, take advantage of the built-in physics, and come up with complex scenarios to make the game you want to play. You can save these and upload them to Disney who will check them for Disney appropriate content and make the best of them available to the Disney Infinity community.

There may be a slight disconnect between the Play Sets and Toy Box modes, as older kids and adults are likely to get more out of the design tools. Still, the game looks like it should be fun for all ages. We will know for sure when the game launches on August 18.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Marc Camron

view all posts

Marc somehow survived E3. The crowds were big, the games were loud and somehow he managed to get a sunburn on the top of his big, bald melon. Yet, despite all of this, he had a blast, seeing people he only sees once a year, playing all of the new games, and staying up way past his bedtime. Next year he might even have a beer. Find him on Twitter @RkyMtnGmr