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Mollie L Patterson At an event here in Los Angeles last night, Evan and I had the chance to get around an hour of hands-on time with Shadow of the Tomb Raider, the third game in the new era of Lara Croft since the 2013 Tomb Raider reboot. Before we get to discussing anything about the game directly, I’m curious Even: how do you feel about Lara and the Tomb Raider series in 2018, now over 20 years since its first game launched?
As someone who’s more aware of her original incarnation back on the PlayStation, it’s always been interesting to see how the developers have transitioned Lara into the modern era. It was a great choice to completely reboot the series in 2013 and introduce a new generation of gamers to her legacy. The name Lara Croft is iconic whether or not people have played a Tomb Raider title, and I like that new audiences have a chance to experience her story. Of course, as times have changed and a lot of games have become grittier, it didn’t surprise me to see the survival aspect added to her tomb-raiding antics. How about you? Evan Slead
Mollie When I played the reboot, I had really mixed feelings on the game, because it didn’t do some of the things I was expecting and hoping for from it. Over time, though, I’ve come to like it far more than I did at first, even if it still isn’t quite the game I wanted it to be. I have the same feeling about Lara herself, though. I really like the more “realistic” Lara we got, because her older self had long become boring to me personally. And yet, like the games, there’s just been something off about her and how she’s been handled, and I actually feel that works a bit into how this game is being positioned. We were told at the reveal event that this was to be the last chapter in the “Lara becomes the legendary Tomb Raider” trilogy, but—it’s kind of weird for me to have that be spread over three games? And we already got the “Lara has become that Lara” moment in the original when she dual-weld pistols? And I’m not quite sure I like saying that there’s a definitive point where she becomes the “Tomb Raider,” versus having her be a more fleshed-out character that grows in different ways across every game?
 
I see what you mean about how this latest trilogy is handling her arc. I’ve only been able to jump into the first game in Lara’s reboot story, so it was odd to hear that Shadow of the Tomb Raider will finally classify her as an actual “Tomb Raider.” However, according to the demo that we were both able to play, it does seem that this final installment in the trilogy is painting Lara in a different light. Her survival skills are on point and she isn’t afraid to hunt down Trinity, but we see her make a controversial decision in doing so. It seems the writers want to take Lara down a darker path before she can experience that, as you said, definite point where she becomes the Tomb Raider. Evan
Mollie There’s a few points you hit on there that I definitely wanted to bring up with you, but—and I don’t mean to make it seems like I think everything is bad with the themes of Shadow—there was a moment during the presentation that really, really bothered me. They talked about how Lara now had the skills and fighting ability to “terrorize” her foes, and using that word—terrorize—in terms of a character like Lara just felt so incredibly wrong to me. I also cringed a bit when they talked about her becoming an “apex predator.” Those were character traits I never felt from the old Lara, and in this reboot series, while I have felt like she’s been too violent/combat-focused at times, through the original and what I played of Rise of the Tomb Raider, it seemed more about her trying to keep herself alive and less about being a hunter stalking her prey. That was one of the things I most wanted to touch upon with you, to see if you had any reaction to all of that.
No, I understand your reactions to those moments. When I look at Lara’s goal to bring down Trinity, I completely understand and appreciate that she would now be in “hunter” mode. I like knowing that, as a character, she’s not holding back when it comes to stopping her enemy. However, classifying her as a “predator” doesn’t really work outside of that specific scenario, so I’m slightly uneasy about how the story and her arc will play out in Shadow. I mean, we also got a slight taste of what’s to come with a decision she makes in the demo’s tomb area, which spirals into a catastrophe. That’s where I stepped outside of the gameplay experience and thought, “Are we really going here?” And we did. With that said, I’m curious about your feelings on Lara’s choice in the tomb, and of course, how you felt about the gameplay we were able to experience in the Shadow demo. Evan
Mollie Well, so I guess the first thing that really hit me when playing the demo was just how gorgeous Shadow is. The slice we got to see kicks off in a Mexican village during what I believe (in my caucasian understanding of our neighbors to the south) is a Day of the Dead festival, and I legitimately was a bit blown away by all of the little intricacies and details and colors of the village. Maybe it’s because I’m not used to playing in 4K, but wow did it impress me. Some of the other areas of the game looked great as well, and while I am a bit worried about what kind of visual variety we’ll get due to major chunks of the game looking to take place underground—at least in terms of tombs, from what I took away from the presentation—I think we’re going to be adventuring around some stunning locales. Also, I was a bit worried about how Lara herself would look due to the way her face seemed in the renders and first elements shown, but I thought her in-game model was fine (if a bit older-looking).
 
I couldn’t agree more about the visuals. It’s not often that I am pulled into a game so quickly, especially since the festival opener is mostly a cutscene that transitions into letting the player just move Lara around a sea of people, but I couldn’t look away from all of the amazing details in the scene. My hope, which sounds similar to yours, is that Eidos Montreal and Crystal Dynamics didn’t place the most visually interesting area right at the beginning and then fill the rest of the game with jungle settings. We were told that the jungle would be a character of its own in this game, so we’ll see a lot of it, but if the rest of Shadow has moments similar to the festival, I could see players with 4K setups being very happy. When it came to gameplay, I was impressed by how easy it was for me to pick up the controls for traversing the various landscapes and obstacles on the way to the demo’s tomb. Lara’s skills with climbing, jumping, and ropes were enjoyable to use, especially her ability to repel down a cliffside using that rope. It was an interesting mechanic to be able to slowly descend from a wall and either drop down from her rope or start swinging like a pendulum to get her ready to jump to a nearby landing spot. Evan
Mollie I did have to laugh when the game told me I could use a repelling rope, because the old “Tomb Raider vs Uncharted” argument instantly popped into my head. And, to be honest, the feature was almost a bit disconcerting to me at first. Everything I learned from the previous games taught me not to consider just going down from a rock face at any given moment—if I did descent it was because I was falling to my death. Now, to suddenly just decide “well I’m dropping down now” was a super difficulty thing to wrap my head around. I’m definitely interest to see how it (and the rest of the swingings/rope-use mechanics) play out in the game, and if they live up to the potential that’s there. (And, to be clear, you can’t rapel down anywhere you want—just from the rock types that you can traverse with the ice axe.) Bigger than that for me gameplay-wise, however, was swimming. I didn’t realize how much I’d missed the swimming elements from the classic games—and how much having it back would give me such a sense of nostalgia—until I dove into the first big pool of water I came across in the demo.
Funny enough, when we were told swimming would be a big part of Shadow I cringed inside (possibly outwardly, too). I’ve never been a huge fan of swimming levels, which to be fair, has stemmed from playing games that haven’t developed the best mechanics for it. However, once I dove into the water for the first time, I was glad to see how easy it was to pick up. One button is dedicated to ascending and another for diving, while the trigger buttons (we played on Xbox One X) could be held down to swim faster. I also have pretty severe claustrophobia, so the moment where Lara had to push through a small opening underwater really made me feel the survival aspect of the game. I think where I’m mostly concerned about the gameplay is the combat. While I typically tried to sneak up on enemies and kill them quietly with Lara’s sneak attacks, there were some moments that I was spotted and had to use my bow or gun. For the most part, aiming and firing the bow worked well enough, but aiming with the rifle was a mess. The third-person perspective when shooting felt like the camera was too close to the action, making it hard to properly aim. I ended up just wildly moving the gun back and forth to spray bullets toward enemies. It could’ve been the aiming settings on my controller, but I’ve played enough shooters, first-person and third-person both, to know when something is off. Evan
Mollie So, I’m really glad that you said that, because there was a certain encounter—and I’m sure you’re thinking about the same one here—where I just felt useless at video games because of how bad I was doing. It got to the point where one of the staff for the event came over to give me tips on the fight, which made me feel even worse. [laughs] I used the bow a lot in the previous games, and I was doing mostly fine with it here, but when I switched to the guns, I was just having the absolute worst time killing people. I didn’t know if it was the aim sensitivity (which we couldn’t tweak), or a change to the gun mechanics, or the camera, something else, but yeah, it just felt so off. And I mean, it’s way too early to make a real judgement, we couldn’t mess with 95% of the control options, and it just might come down to a revision to how the game’s gunplay works or something else, but as someone who loves third-person shooters and plays plenty of them, I just felt like garbage in the few big firefights that I encountered.
I definitely know what part you’re referring to because I died there a handful of times. I don’t think we were alone, though, because I noticed other attendees were switching to the bow whenever possible. It should be said that, outside of the bow and gun, we had access to molotov cocktails that could be crafted and thrown. I actually never used one, but instead, threw the empty bottle to distract a few mercenaries so that I could stealth kill another enemy that was left alone. I’m hoping that most of Shadow’s enemy encounters can be done with stealth tactics, but as you said, it’s early to pass too much judgement on the shooting. Evan
Mollie Also–while I’m someone who is always a bit weary of stealth elements in non-stealth games—there were some interesting new options for Lara to take a less direct route to dispatching foes. The biggest I found was that she can now hide in some of the bigger bunches of vines covering walls, where Lara can then either just wait there and unleash a surprise attack, or move along the wall and sneak past enemy patrols.
 
Okay, but really, I’ve been dying to talk about the moment from the demo. How did you feel about Lara causing a flood? Evan
Mollie So, yeah, that was easily one of the biggest take-aways I had from the demo. This may get into a bit of spoiler territory, but basically, Lara is trying to hunt down a certain location before Trinity, and in looking for its whereabouts, she comes across an intricate Mayan dagger that seems to be the key to unlock the powers of creation and destruction. Of course, Lara being Lara, she snatches up the dagger before Trinity can get it, but we’re told—though we don’t really know if it’s true or not—that her doing so has set in motion the coming of something really, really bad. I thought it was a fascinating moment, and I’m both excited and worried about where it’ll be taken. I mean, given the cutscene we saw and the repercussions behind her actions, Lara is almost the bad guy in that moment—or at least a naive treasure hunter who doesn’t appreciate what her raiding of cultural sites and taking their artifacts really means. Like, it’ll be easy for the game to have what we saw, and then a “sad Lara” moment where she now decides she has to just fix everything, but if there’s ambition behind the writing and development team, something super interesting can come from Shadow of the Tomb Raider—something that has me legitimately excited for a game that easily could have been “Even More Tomb Raider.”
It was the defining moment of the demo for me as well. I’ll admit that during the presentation before the demo I assumed that Shadow’s story would just be another rehash of watching a character try to be one step ahead of a mysterious and nefarious organization. However, once Lara took the dagger, and I appreciated that the scene showed her conflicted over whether she should take it or leave it, the plot became something I never expected. I think it’s fascinating to watch a hero make a decision that will make the antagonist look like the sane one in the battle, so I came away from those final moments feeling optimistic about the possibilities of Shadow’s story. As we touched on earlier, while we don’t agree with the idea that Lara should have a single defining moment that makes her the Tomb Raider, I can begin to see what the creators are possibly alluding to when experiencing this moment. Lara even steps beyond a naive mistake and might have caused the deaths of hundreds of people, which—not to sound too nihilistic—is a fresh way of approaching the archetypal hero’s journey. Evan
Mollie Yeah, that’s what I really wasn’t expecting: for the big bad Trinity guy to actually come off like the hero, and for Lara to not quickly realize (or at least act like) she had really screwed up and maybe should re-think what she does next. And given the three games have had a bit of a continual through-line, what if the stories about her father and his feud with Trinity and all of that weren’t really what we’ve been lead to believe? Kind of like you said, I think if they want to position Shadow of the Tomb Raider as the “Lara becomes the Tomb Raider” piece of the trilogy, that suddenly gets way, way more interesting if it’s coming from her having enormously screwed up and having to almost be reborn like a phoenix in the end from the mess she’s caused. Just, again, I’m so, so afraid the true potential of what’s been presented won’t be acted upon. I’ve seen so many games offer up such fascinating premises, either to chicken out quickly or not build them up like they could have been. This is one of those moments when I’d love to be wrong, though.
Right, I understand your hesitation with how it could possibly drop everything interesting. All in all, I would say I came away enjoying Shadow of the Tomb Raider more than I thought I was going to, so here’s to hoping the final release delivers on our hopes. Evan
Mollie Well speaking of delivering on hopes—we learned yesterday from French magazine Jeux Vidéo that not only will Jonah be back, but also Reyes and Sam. Does this mean that maybe, just maybe, just maybe I’ll get my Lara / Sam shipper ending like The Legend of Korra’s fans got? Am I crazy for hoping for that?!
You’re only crazy if you give up on your dreams. Evan
 

 

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Shadow of the Tomb Raider’s Lara is older, bolder—which is both good and bad

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of tombs, I will fear no evil

By EGM Staff | 04/27/2018 06:00 AM PT | Updated 04/27/2018 10:47 AM PT

Previews

 

Mollie L Patterson At an event here in Los Angeles last night, Evan and I had the chance to get around an hour of hands-on time with Shadow of the Tomb Raider, the third game in the new era of Lara Croft since the 2013 Tomb Raider reboot. Before we get to discussing anything about the game directly, I’m curious Even: how do you feel about Lara and the Tomb Raider series in 2018, now over 20 years since its first game launched?
As someone who’s more aware of her original incarnation back on the PlayStation, it’s always been interesting to see how the developers have transitioned Lara into the modern era. It was a great choice to completely reboot the series in 2013 and introduce a new generation of gamers to her legacy. The name Lara Croft is iconic whether or not people have played a Tomb Raider title, and I like that new audiences have a chance to experience her story. Of course, as times have changed and a lot of games have become grittier, it didn’t surprise me to see the survival aspect added to her tomb-raiding antics. How about you? Evan Slead
Mollie When I played the reboot, I had really mixed feelings on the game, because it didn’t do some of the things I was expecting and hoping for from it. Over time, though, I’ve come to like it far more than I did at first, even if it still isn’t quite the game I wanted it to be. I have the same feeling about Lara herself, though. I really like the more “realistic” Lara we got, because her older self had long become boring to me personally. And yet, like the games, there’s just been something off about her and how she’s been handled, and I actually feel that works a bit into how this game is being positioned. We were told at the reveal event that this was to be the last chapter in the “Lara becomes the legendary Tomb Raider” trilogy, but—it’s kind of weird for me to have that be spread over three games? And we already got the “Lara has become that Lara” moment in the original when she dual-weld pistols? And I’m not quite sure I like saying that there’s a definitive point where she becomes the “Tomb Raider,” versus having her be a more fleshed-out character that grows in different ways across every game?
 
I see what you mean about how this latest trilogy is handling her arc. I’ve only been able to jump into the first game in Lara’s reboot story, so it was odd to hear that Shadow of the Tomb Raider will finally classify her as an actual “Tomb Raider.” However, according to the demo that we were both able to play, it does seem that this final installment in the trilogy is painting Lara in a different light. Her survival skills are on point and she isn’t afraid to hunt down Trinity, but we see her make a controversial decision in doing so. It seems the writers want to take Lara down a darker path before she can experience that, as you said, definite point where she becomes the Tomb Raider. Evan
Mollie There’s a few points you hit on there that I definitely wanted to bring up with you, but—and I don’t mean to make it seems like I think everything is bad with the themes of Shadow—there was a moment during the presentation that really, really bothered me. They talked about how Lara now had the skills and fighting ability to “terrorize” her foes, and using that word—terrorize—in terms of a character like Lara just felt so incredibly wrong to me. I also cringed a bit when they talked about her becoming an “apex predator.” Those were character traits I never felt from the old Lara, and in this reboot series, while I have felt like she’s been too violent/combat-focused at times, through the original and what I played of Rise of the Tomb Raider, it seemed more about her trying to keep herself alive and less about being a hunter stalking her prey. That was one of the things I most wanted to touch upon with you, to see if you had any reaction to all of that.
No, I understand your reactions to those moments. When I look at Lara’s goal to bring down Trinity, I completely understand and appreciate that she would now be in “hunter” mode. I like knowing that, as a character, she’s not holding back when it comes to stopping her enemy. However, classifying her as a “predator” doesn’t really work outside of that specific scenario, so I’m slightly uneasy about how the story and her arc will play out in Shadow. I mean, we also got a slight taste of what’s to come with a decision she makes in the demo’s tomb area, which spirals into a catastrophe. That’s where I stepped outside of the gameplay experience and thought, “Are we really going here?” And we did. With that said, I’m curious about your feelings on Lara’s choice in the tomb, and of course, how you felt about the gameplay we were able to experience in the Shadow demo. Evan
Mollie Well, so I guess the first thing that really hit me when playing the demo was just how gorgeous Shadow is. The slice we got to see kicks off in a Mexican village during what I believe (in my caucasian understanding of our neighbors to the south) is a Day of the Dead festival, and I legitimately was a bit blown away by all of the little intricacies and details and colors of the village. Maybe it’s because I’m not used to playing in 4K, but wow did it impress me. Some of the other areas of the game looked great as well, and while I am a bit worried about what kind of visual variety we’ll get due to major chunks of the game looking to take place underground—at least in terms of tombs, from what I took away from the presentation—I think we’re going to be adventuring around some stunning locales. Also, I was a bit worried about how Lara herself would look due to the way her face seemed in the renders and first elements shown, but I thought her in-game model was fine (if a bit older-looking).
 
I couldn’t agree more about the visuals. It’s not often that I am pulled into a game so quickly, especially since the festival opener is mostly a cutscene that transitions into letting the player just move Lara around a sea of people, but I couldn’t look away from all of the amazing details in the scene. My hope, which sounds similar to yours, is that Eidos Montreal and Crystal Dynamics didn’t place the most visually interesting area right at the beginning and then fill the rest of the game with jungle settings. We were told that the jungle would be a character of its own in this game, so we’ll see a lot of it, but if the rest of Shadow has moments similar to the festival, I could see players with 4K setups being very happy. When it came to gameplay, I was impressed by how easy it was for me to pick up the controls for traversing the various landscapes and obstacles on the way to the demo’s tomb. Lara’s skills with climbing, jumping, and ropes were enjoyable to use, especially her ability to repel down a cliffside using that rope. It was an interesting mechanic to be able to slowly descend from a wall and either drop down from her rope or start swinging like a pendulum to get her ready to jump to a nearby landing spot. Evan
Mollie I did have to laugh when the game told me I could use a repelling rope, because the old “Tomb Raider vs Uncharted” argument instantly popped into my head. And, to be honest, the feature was almost a bit disconcerting to me at first. Everything I learned from the previous games taught me not to consider just going down from a rock face at any given moment—if I did descent it was because I was falling to my death. Now, to suddenly just decide “well I’m dropping down now” was a super difficulty thing to wrap my head around. I’m definitely interest to see how it (and the rest of the swingings/rope-use mechanics) play out in the game, and if they live up to the potential that’s there. (And, to be clear, you can’t rapel down anywhere you want—just from the rock types that you can traverse with the ice axe.) Bigger than that for me gameplay-wise, however, was swimming. I didn’t realize how much I’d missed the swimming elements from the classic games—and how much having it back would give me such a sense of nostalgia—until I dove into the first big pool of water I came across in the demo.
Funny enough, when we were told swimming would be a big part of Shadow I cringed inside (possibly outwardly, too). I’ve never been a huge fan of swimming levels, which to be fair, has stemmed from playing games that haven’t developed the best mechanics for it. However, once I dove into the water for the first time, I was glad to see how easy it was to pick up. One button is dedicated to ascending and another for diving, while the trigger buttons (we played on Xbox One X) could be held down to swim faster. I also have pretty severe claustrophobia, so the moment where Lara had to push through a small opening underwater really made me feel the survival aspect of the game. I think where I’m mostly concerned about the gameplay is the combat. While I typically tried to sneak up on enemies and kill them quietly with Lara’s sneak attacks, there were some moments that I was spotted and had to use my bow or gun. For the most part, aiming and firing the bow worked well enough, but aiming with the rifle was a mess. The third-person perspective when shooting felt like the camera was too close to the action, making it hard to properly aim. I ended up just wildly moving the gun back and forth to spray bullets toward enemies. It could’ve been the aiming settings on my controller, but I’ve played enough shooters, first-person and third-person both, to know when something is off. Evan
Mollie So, I’m really glad that you said that, because there was a certain encounter—and I’m sure you’re thinking about the same one here—where I just felt useless at video games because of how bad I was doing. It got to the point where one of the staff for the event came over to give me tips on the fight, which made me feel even worse. [laughs] I used the bow a lot in the previous games, and I was doing mostly fine with it here, but when I switched to the guns, I was just having the absolute worst time killing people. I didn’t know if it was the aim sensitivity (which we couldn’t tweak), or a change to the gun mechanics, or the camera, something else, but yeah, it just felt so off. And I mean, it’s way too early to make a real judgement, we couldn’t mess with 95% of the control options, and it just might come down to a revision to how the game’s gunplay works or something else, but as someone who loves third-person shooters and plays plenty of them, I just felt like garbage in the few big firefights that I encountered.
I definitely know what part you’re referring to because I died there a handful of times. I don’t think we were alone, though, because I noticed other attendees were switching to the bow whenever possible. It should be said that, outside of the bow and gun, we had access to molotov cocktails that could be crafted and thrown. I actually never used one, but instead, threw the empty bottle to distract a few mercenaries so that I could stealth kill another enemy that was left alone. I’m hoping that most of Shadow’s enemy encounters can be done with stealth tactics, but as you said, it’s early to pass too much judgement on the shooting. Evan
Mollie Also–while I’m someone who is always a bit weary of stealth elements in non-stealth games—there were some interesting new options for Lara to take a less direct route to dispatching foes. The biggest I found was that she can now hide in some of the bigger bunches of vines covering walls, where Lara can then either just wait there and unleash a surprise attack, or move along the wall and sneak past enemy patrols.
 
Okay, but really, I’ve been dying to talk about the moment from the demo. How did you feel about Lara causing a flood? Evan
Mollie So, yeah, that was easily one of the biggest take-aways I had from the demo. This may get into a bit of spoiler territory, but basically, Lara is trying to hunt down a certain location before Trinity, and in looking for its whereabouts, she comes across an intricate Mayan dagger that seems to be the key to unlock the powers of creation and destruction. Of course, Lara being Lara, she snatches up the dagger before Trinity can get it, but we’re told—though we don’t really know if it’s true or not—that her doing so has set in motion the coming of something really, really bad. I thought it was a fascinating moment, and I’m both excited and worried about where it’ll be taken. I mean, given the cutscene we saw and the repercussions behind her actions, Lara is almost the bad guy in that moment—or at least a naive treasure hunter who doesn’t appreciate what her raiding of cultural sites and taking their artifacts really means. Like, it’ll be easy for the game to have what we saw, and then a “sad Lara” moment where she now decides she has to just fix everything, but if there’s ambition behind the writing and development team, something super interesting can come from Shadow of the Tomb Raider—something that has me legitimately excited for a game that easily could have been “Even More Tomb Raider.”
It was the defining moment of the demo for me as well. I’ll admit that during the presentation before the demo I assumed that Shadow’s story would just be another rehash of watching a character try to be one step ahead of a mysterious and nefarious organization. However, once Lara took the dagger, and I appreciated that the scene showed her conflicted over whether she should take it or leave it, the plot became something I never expected. I think it’s fascinating to watch a hero make a decision that will make the antagonist look like the sane one in the battle, so I came away from those final moments feeling optimistic about the possibilities of Shadow’s story. As we touched on earlier, while we don’t agree with the idea that Lara should have a single defining moment that makes her the Tomb Raider, I can begin to see what the creators are possibly alluding to when experiencing this moment. Lara even steps beyond a naive mistake and might have caused the deaths of hundreds of people, which—not to sound too nihilistic—is a fresh way of approaching the archetypal hero’s journey. Evan
Mollie Yeah, that’s what I really wasn’t expecting: for the big bad Trinity guy to actually come off like the hero, and for Lara to not quickly realize (or at least act like) she had really screwed up and maybe should re-think what she does next. And given the three games have had a bit of a continual through-line, what if the stories about her father and his feud with Trinity and all of that weren’t really what we’ve been lead to believe? Kind of like you said, I think if they want to position Shadow of the Tomb Raider as the “Lara becomes the Tomb Raider” piece of the trilogy, that suddenly gets way, way more interesting if it’s coming from her having enormously screwed up and having to almost be reborn like a phoenix in the end from the mess she’s caused. Just, again, I’m so, so afraid the true potential of what’s been presented won’t be acted upon. I’ve seen so many games offer up such fascinating premises, either to chicken out quickly or not build them up like they could have been. This is one of those moments when I’d love to be wrong, though.
Right, I understand your hesitation with how it could possibly drop everything interesting. All in all, I would say I came away enjoying Shadow of the Tomb Raider more than I thought I was going to, so here’s to hoping the final release delivers on our hopes. Evan
Mollie Well speaking of delivering on hopes—we learned yesterday from French magazine Jeux Vidéo that not only will Jonah be back, but also Reyes and Sam. Does this mean that maybe, just maybe, just maybe I’ll get my Lara / Sam shipper ending like The Legend of Korra’s fans got? Am I crazy for hoping for that?!
You’re only crazy if you give up on your dreams. Evan
 

 

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