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Mind The Gap #13 [Image Comics] Review

By
Posted on August 28, 2013 AT 07:46pm

The first issue of the “R.I.Peterssen” arc of Jim McCann’s Mind The Gap has begun, and with the shocking reveal in the last issue, this series is going to get very complicated, and fast. With the last issue finally revealing the events of Elle Peterssen’s attack, a memory that has finally returned to the mind of the comatose protagonist, the entirety of the plot against her and the events of the plan concocted by those close to her is finally beginning to make at least some semblance of sense. The only issue here is if Elle and those poised to help her can figure everything out before the rest of the plan is put into play, the goal of which is to take Elle out of the picture once and for all.

This issue is told in two major parts: the past and the present. The past portion focuses on the life of the newly-revealed member of this elite group, “The Fifth”, who just happens to be (Spoilers from Issue #12) Elle’s grandfather, Erik, who as a German-born boy, is given a task by this father during the events of World War II. This, decades later, leads to the reveal of not only the true events of Elle’s “attack”, but of the involvement of the characters brought in up until this point, including those who looked to only be involved from an outside perspective. This leads to an explosion of new threads to the story, but they all look to be wrapped up relatively soon, as this is only a two-issue arc.

Jim McCann is getting to the point where the plot of this series if hitting a breaking point, and with this issue, he gives it a bit of new life with the reveal of a plot that reacches as far back as World War II. This new wrinkle makes things even more complicated (which didn’t seem possible), and gives a brand new meaning to a group that was originally seen only as those in the present, something that is entirely untrue. Weaving a masterful plot, McCann is hitting the point where the major seeds he’s sown throughout these first thirteen issues are about to finally pay off, and with that comes the expectation for a huge resolution for what has been an amazing series. This issue has some major set-up, and while it’s beginning to get to the point where it’s almost too dense a plot, those who have been and are able to keep following along should be itching for the next issue and the upcoming resolution of this intricate plot.

The art team is set up into two parts as well on this issue, with Rodin Esquejo returning to the book, along with Arif Prianto doing the work on the events of the present. Dan McDaid brings his signature style to the past events, teaming with Lee Loughridge in what is a decidedly different style of artwork. Both look great, and the vibrant and bright colors of both Prianto and Loughridge are evident in every panel, with Esquejo’s gorgeous realism and McDaid’s more atypical work filling each page with beauty.

Summary: The biggest arc yet in the mystery that is Mind The Gap takes a major turn in this issue, just in time for what is going to be a big reveal for the series. While a bit harder to follow, this issue brings new perspective onto what is already an engrossing series, and the dynamic art styles of both the past and the present lend themselves well to the writing. While not as exciting as the last issue (though that’s a tough act to follow), some new light on the events at hand and some new questions in the case of Elle Peterssen have been revealed. This is one of the most engaging books in comics at the moment, and with this issue, things just got much more interesting.

Pros: Terrific Writing, Gorgeous Artwork

Cons: Plot Is A Bit Hard To Follow At Times

Grade: A

Russ Pirozek, known as "Noobcrawler" to some, is a gamer and comic book fan who sometimes gets around to writing for DigitalNoob.com. He's also awesome. If someone looked up "awesome" in the dictionary, his picture wouldn't be there, but that's because he's too busy being awesome to pose for a photo.


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