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According to a document obtained by Kotaku 3D Reams has dropped their lawsuit against Gearbox Software over unpaid royalties for Duke Nukem Forever.

Earlier this year, in June, 3D Realms sued Gearbox, filing a lawsuit in Texas state court that claimed the company was owed over $2 million in royalties in fees for their work on Duke Nukem Forever (which Gearbox completed and released in 2011.

According to a letter from 3D Realms co-founder Scott Miller—the document Kotaku obtained—the dropped lawsuit was voluntary and no money was exchanged between the two companies.

“We regret the misunderstanding that instigated our lawsuit,” Miller wrote. “Now that we better understand—and appreciate—the actual nature of our business matters, we have voluntarily withdrawn our claims against Gearbox, with genuine apologies to Randy [Pitchford, president of Gearbox] for any damage that our lawsuit may have caused to the relationship.”

3D Realms Drops Duke Nukem Forever Lawsuit Against Gearbox Software

By | 09/13/2013 03:22 PM PT

News

According to a document obtained by Kotaku 3D Reams has dropped their lawsuit against Gearbox Software over unpaid royalties for Duke Nukem Forever.

Earlier this year, in June, 3D Realms sued Gearbox, filing a lawsuit in Texas state court that claimed the company was owed over $2 million in royalties in fees for their work on Duke Nukem Forever (which Gearbox completed and released in 2011.

According to a letter from 3D Realms co-founder Scott Miller—the document Kotaku obtained—the dropped lawsuit was voluntary and no money was exchanged between the two companies.

“We regret the misunderstanding that instigated our lawsuit,” Miller wrote. “Now that we better understand—and appreciate—the actual nature of our business matters, we have voluntarily withdrawn our claims against Gearbox, with genuine apologies to Randy [Pitchford, president of Gearbox] for any damage that our lawsuit may have caused to the relationship.”

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