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Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons developer Starbreeze Studios has agreed to sell the game to its publisher, 505 Games, for the hefty sum of $500,000 in cash.

In a buzzword-laden press release, both parties celebrated the deal.

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons is a remarkable game, one of the most affecting games of the last generation and one of which 505 Games has been very proud to be associated,” said 505 president Ian Howe. “This acquisition reflects 505 Games’ stated strategy of owning and controlling its own IP, and, moreover, IP that can contribute something meaningful to the world of interactive entertainment.”

“The sale represents our final transition to the digital strategy,” said Starbreeze CEO Bo Andersson Klint. “With Brothers we?ve created a strong and critically acclaimed IP, which we now feel can be best nurtured under a new owner. Going forward, we will continue development focused on expansive design, a concept proven with the Payday franchise. Brothers will continue to generate awe and admiration for the great storytelling standard Josef Fares set under 505 Games watchful eye.”

If anyone has any idea how selling the rights to a downloadable game make for a “transition to the digital strategy” or what “expansive design” actually means in human language, let me know.

What’s equally unclear for the moment is whether 505 intends to build upon the franchise with new titles, though the relatively steep price tag would certainly indicate as much. Still, Brothers told a story that had a pretty clear beginning and, especially, end, so it’s hard to imagine a natural sequel. There’s obviously room to tell unrelated stories within the same world, but that would mean finding a mechanic that fit that narrative as well as Brothers‘ twin stick, dual-control mechanic related to its title characters.

Whatever 505 does with Brothers, they’ll have to do it without the game’s creative mastermind, Swedish film director Josef Fares. He’s moved on to his own studio, Hazelight, which is working on a currently unnamed title for EA, the first tease of which was offered during The Game Awards in December.

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About Josh Harmon

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Josh picked up a controller when he was 3 years old—and he hasn’t looked back since. This has made him particularly vulnerable to attacks from behind. He joined EGM as an intern following a brief-but-storied career on a number of small gaming blogs across the Internet. Find him on Twitter @jorshy

505 Games buys rights to Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons for $500K

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons developer Starbreeze Studios has agreed to sell the game to its publisher, 505 Games, for the hefty sum of $500,000 in cash.

By Josh Harmon | 01/16/2015 03:34 PM PT

News

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons developer Starbreeze Studios has agreed to sell the game to its publisher, 505 Games, for the hefty sum of $500,000 in cash.

In a buzzword-laden press release, both parties celebrated the deal.

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons is a remarkable game, one of the most affecting games of the last generation and one of which 505 Games has been very proud to be associated,” said 505 president Ian Howe. “This acquisition reflects 505 Games’ stated strategy of owning and controlling its own IP, and, moreover, IP that can contribute something meaningful to the world of interactive entertainment.”

“The sale represents our final transition to the digital strategy,” said Starbreeze CEO Bo Andersson Klint. “With Brothers we?ve created a strong and critically acclaimed IP, which we now feel can be best nurtured under a new owner. Going forward, we will continue development focused on expansive design, a concept proven with the Payday franchise. Brothers will continue to generate awe and admiration for the great storytelling standard Josef Fares set under 505 Games watchful eye.”

If anyone has any idea how selling the rights to a downloadable game make for a “transition to the digital strategy” or what “expansive design” actually means in human language, let me know.

What’s equally unclear for the moment is whether 505 intends to build upon the franchise with new titles, though the relatively steep price tag would certainly indicate as much. Still, Brothers told a story that had a pretty clear beginning and, especially, end, so it’s hard to imagine a natural sequel. There’s obviously room to tell unrelated stories within the same world, but that would mean finding a mechanic that fit that narrative as well as Brothers‘ twin stick, dual-control mechanic related to its title characters.

Whatever 505 does with Brothers, they’ll have to do it without the game’s creative mastermind, Swedish film director Josef Fares. He’s moved on to his own studio, Hazelight, which is working on a currently unnamed title for EA, the first tease of which was offered during The Game Awards in December.

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Josh Harmon

view all posts

Josh picked up a controller when he was 3 years old—and he hasn’t looked back since. This has made him particularly vulnerable to attacks from behind. He joined EGM as an intern following a brief-but-storied career on a number of small gaming blogs across the Internet. Find him on Twitter @jorshy