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Speaking at the Gamelab conference in Barcelona, Assassin’s Creed creator Patrice Désilets touched upon his continuing crusade to reclaim 1666: Amsterdam from Ubisoft.

“I’m fighting for it, and that’s all I can say for now,” said Désilets. “I’m sorry guys, it was amazing. And it still is amazing, and I hope to get it back and finish it for you—and for me.

“The [games] medium is really in its infancy. It’s so much easier in terms of production and coding to just blow stuff up than to create an interaction about human beings. It’s so much more subtle than killing. Eventually we’ll get there, and it’s really a shame that I cannot finish 1666, because it was about tall of that.”

After leaving the company in 2010 to work for THQ Montreal in 2011, Désilets returned to Ubisoft in March following THQ’s bankruptcy as part of their acquisition of THQ Montreal. Désilets was summarily terminated in May along with other members of his team.

Earlier this month, Désilets filed a lawsuit against Ubisoft seeking $400,000 in reimbursement, severance, insurance, damages, and various fees. A “turnaround right” clause is included in the suit in order for Désilets to reclaim ownership of 1666: Amsterdam—the ambitious project the developer started work on at THQ Montreal, and something Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot claimed to love.

Assassin’s Creed Creator Fighting Ubisoft for Control Over Lost Project, 1666: Amsterdam

By | 06/27/2013 01:49 PM PT

News

Speaking at the Gamelab conference in Barcelona, Assassin’s Creed creator Patrice Désilets touched upon his continuing crusade to reclaim 1666: Amsterdam from Ubisoft.

“I’m fighting for it, and that’s all I can say for now,” said Désilets. “I’m sorry guys, it was amazing. And it still is amazing, and I hope to get it back and finish it for you—and for me.

“The [games] medium is really in its infancy. It’s so much easier in terms of production and coding to just blow stuff up than to create an interaction about human beings. It’s so much more subtle than killing. Eventually we’ll get there, and it’s really a shame that I cannot finish 1666, because it was about tall of that.”

After leaving the company in 2010 to work for THQ Montreal in 2011, Désilets returned to Ubisoft in March following THQ’s bankruptcy as part of their acquisition of THQ Montreal. Désilets was summarily terminated in May along with other members of his team.

Earlier this month, Désilets filed a lawsuit against Ubisoft seeking $400,000 in reimbursement, severance, insurance, damages, and various fees. A “turnaround right” clause is included in the suit in order for Désilets to reclaim ownership of 1666: Amsterdam—the ambitious project the developer started work on at THQ Montreal, and something Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot claimed to love.

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