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Speaking at a BAFTA event in London last night, Ken Levine explained how it was his call to can the BioShock film—a decision he made after budgetary compromises and a change of directors.

“There was a deal in place and it was actually in production at Universal, and Gore Verbinski was directing it,” said Levine. “And what happened wasthis is my theoryit’s a very big movie and Gore was very excited about it and he wanted to make a very dark, what he would call a ‘hard-rated’ horror filman R rated film with a lot of blood. Then The Watchmen came outand I really liked The Watchmenbut it didn’t do well for whatever reason and the studio got cold feet about making an R rated $200 million film.

“So they said, ‘Gore, what about it if it was an $80 million film?’ and enough time had gone by where Gore didn’t want to make an $80 million dollar film. And so they brought another director in and I didn’t really see the match thereTake Two is one of those companies that gives a lot of trust to their creative people and so they said to me, ‘if you want to kill it Ken, kill it.’ And I killed it.

“Which was weird, having been a screenwriter going around begging to re-write any script to being in a position where you’re killing a movie that you worked so much on. It was saying, ‘You know what? I don’t need to compromise.’ I had the [Bioshock] world, and I didn’t what to see it done in a way I didn’t think was right.”

While BioShock may not get the silver screen treatment, its legacy lives on in BioShock Infinite, which soars onto PC, PS3,and  Xbox 360 March 26.

Ken Levine Killed the BioShock Flick, Here’s Why

By | 03/12/2013 03:37 PM PT

News

Speaking at a BAFTA event in London last night, Ken Levine explained how it was his call to can the BioShock film—a decision he made after budgetary compromises and a change of directors.

“There was a deal in place and it was actually in production at Universal, and Gore Verbinski was directing it,” said Levine. “And what happened wasthis is my theoryit’s a very big movie and Gore was very excited about it and he wanted to make a very dark, what he would call a ‘hard-rated’ horror filman R rated film with a lot of blood. Then The Watchmen came outand I really liked The Watchmenbut it didn’t do well for whatever reason and the studio got cold feet about making an R rated $200 million film.

“So they said, ‘Gore, what about it if it was an $80 million film?’ and enough time had gone by where Gore didn’t want to make an $80 million dollar film. And so they brought another director in and I didn’t really see the match thereTake Two is one of those companies that gives a lot of trust to their creative people and so they said to me, ‘if you want to kill it Ken, kill it.’ And I killed it.

“Which was weird, having been a screenwriter going around begging to re-write any script to being in a position where you’re killing a movie that you worked so much on. It was saying, ‘You know what? I don’t need to compromise.’ I had the [Bioshock] world, and I didn’t what to see it done in a way I didn’t think was right.”

While BioShock may not get the silver screen treatment, its legacy lives on in BioShock Infinite, which soars onto PC, PS3,and  Xbox 360 March 26.

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